Who's Carl This Time? Carl reads three quotes from famous siblings: a foul-mouthed family, a presidential embarrassment, and two sisters who didn't follow their own advice.

Who's Carl This Time?

Who's Carl This Time?

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Carl reads three quotes from famous siblings: a foul-mouthed family, a presidential embarrassment, and two sisters who didn't follow their own advice.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

Hi, this is Peter Sagal. Due to an appalling lack of stupidity by public figures this week, we are airing our special family-themed WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME! that was recorded in Pasadena, California last year. And please, if you know any celebrities, politicians, dumb bank robbers, kindly have them behave like idiots before next week's show.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

CARL KASELL, Host:

From NPR and Chicago Public Radio, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR news quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. And here's your host, at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California, Peter Sagal.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you all. Thank you, Carl. Yeah. Yeah, it's that kind of day. I share your excitement. And we have a special show for you this week. You know, the news, it comes, the news goes, but what endures week to week? Family endures. Family is permanent, as is their ability to drive you nuts.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So that is our theme this week, families of all kinds. Plus, George Takei will be by to play Not My Job. But as always, you can acquire a family heirloom, Carl's voice on your home answering machine. Give us a call. The number, 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. It's time to welcome our first listener contestant. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

NATALIE TIPPETS: Hi, I'm Natalie Tippets from Salt Lake City, Utah.

SAGAL: Hey, Natalie, how are you?

TIPPETS: I'm doing well, how are you?

SAGAL: I am fine. Salt Lake City is just one of the most beautiful places I know of. What do you do there?

TIPPETS: I work for the University of Utah, and I'm a graduate there as well.

SAGAL: Oh really? You're at the University of Utah?

TIPPETS: Mm-hmm.

SAGAL: Which is sort of up there in the hills looking down, in so many ways, on the rest of the Salt Lake Valley.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

TIPPETS: Yeah, we like to think highly of ourselves.

SAGAL: I know you do.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, welcome to the show, Natalie. Now let me introduce you to our panel this week. First, say hello to a television personality and a contributor to "CBS Sunday Morning," Mr. Mo Rocca.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

TIPPETS: Hello, Mo.

MO ROCCA: Hi, Natalie.

SAGAL: Next, it's one of the women behind the Washington Post's "Reliable Source" column, Ms. Roxanne Roberts.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

TIPPETS: Hello.

ROXANNE ROBERTS: Hi, Natalie.

SAGAL: Finally, say hello to a writer for HBO's "Real Time with Bill Maher," Mr. Adam Felber.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

ADAM FELBER: Hey, Natalie.

SAGAL: Natalie, you're going to play Who's Carl This Time. Carl Kasell, as he always does, is going to start with three quotes. But this time, it's going to be three quotations from famous siblings.

TIPPETS: Oh, boy.

SAGAL: I know. But this is going to be fine. If you can correctly identify or explain just two of these people, or siblings, you'll win our prize, Carl Kasell's voice on your home answering machine.

TIPPETS: Okay.

SAGAL: You ready?

TIPPETS: Mm-hmm.

SAGAL: Now, your first quote is actually on a nameplate on a desk in a White House office.

KASELL: Undersecretary for Go Bleep Yourself.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Now that is not this man's official position in the Obama administration, it does go a long way to describe what person?

TIPPETS: Oh, can you give me a hint?

SAGAL: Well, you know, President Obama is very polite, so when he needs to swear at somebody, he brings in this guy.

TIPPETS: Oh, Rahm Emanuel.

SAGAL: Rahm Emanuel, very good.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Now, the White House chief of staff is famous for his filthy mouth. And this, it turns out, is kind of a tradition in his remarkably accomplished family. Rahm says, quote, "In our house, swearing is a term of affection."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Which is okay for him, he's in politics, and for his brother Ari Emanuel. He's a very powerful Hollywood agent. But it's a little problematic for his brother Ezekial Emanuel. He is a leading medical ethicist who specializes in end-of-life care.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Thus, Ezekial Emanuel's book, "Look, You're Gonna Bleeping Die."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

FELBER: You know, all the Emanuel brothers, Rahm, Ezekial, Ari, they can swear it up, but I hear at the Rahm dinner table, the absolute filthiest is Zippo.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well it turns out they are. I mean, this is an amazing family: three sons, three extraordinarily careers, very famous. Two of them have inspired TV characters. There are other members less well known, as members of the family. For example, their half-brother Brett Favre, originally named Chaim Emanuel(ph), he's done well in football.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Then there was their kid sister, Miley Emanuel.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: Do you think that at Passover even Elijah curses?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Passover at the Emanuel house. Why is this bleeping night so bleeped up?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Really? All right, here is your next quote. It's from another political sibling. He's speaking now in 1993.

KASELL: I'm in this world now, this ethical zone, where everything has to be ethical. And some ethical things are unethical. You know, it's really crazy.

SAGAL: Who thought it was just crazy, ethically speaking, to be the president's half-brother?

ROCCA: I have a CD of his because he's a musician.

SAGAL: Do you really? Well, hang on; let's see if Natalie can get it. He is a musician. That's one of his many activities.

TIPPETS: He's a musician.

SAGAL: 1993.

TIPPETS: '93.

SAGAL: So?

ROBERTS: Arkansas.

TIPPETS: Oh, it's Bill Clinton?

SAGAL: Bill, no.

TIPPETS: His brother.

SAGAL: His brother. Remember his name?

TIPPETS: No, I don't. I was in eighth grade.

SAGAL: Oh.

ROBERTS: Oh.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: That wouldn't have stopped him.

SAGAL: No, actually it was...

ROCCA: Rhymes with dodger.

SAGAL: It was Roger Clinton.

TIPPETS: Oh.

SAGAL: Remember Roger Clinton? Everybody nostalgic for the days of Billy Carter was thrilled to see Bill Clinton's presidential limo followed to the White House by a convicted coke dealer driving a motorized beer cooler.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Roger, now, he could have gone the classic route. You know, instead of Billy Beer, maybe Clinton Country Crack Pipes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But he decided, after his ethical musings, to stay classy. He started an acting career in the '90s, playing such roles, really, as the southern Mayor Bubba in "Pumpkinhead II: Blood Wings."

ROCCA: That's right.

FELBER: Underrated.

SAGAL: Absolutely. But here's the amazing thing. For all this guy's flaws and his shamelessness, for a few glorious months in the second term, he was the less embarrassing Clinton brother.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right, Natalie, you're one for two. If you get this last one, though, you'll win our prize.

TIPPETS: Okay.

SAGAL: Here is your last quote.

KASELL: She's just like a kid who beats a dog until somebody looks, and then she starts petting it.

SAGAL: That quote came from advice columnist Ann Landers. She was talking about her sister. Who was her sister?

TIPPETS: Oh, it's on the tip of my tongue.

SAGAL: On the tip of your tongue? Well I'll give you a hint, is also an advice columnist.

TIPPETS: Yeah.

ROBERTS: Can I give her a...

TIPPETS: Oh, it's right there.

ROBERTS: Dear?

ROCCA: Rhymes with flabby.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

TIPPETS: Abby, Abby Landers.

SAGAL: Dear Abby, Dear Abby.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Yeah. That was Ann Landers describing her sister Abigail Van Buren, or Dear Abby. So it was like, Dear Ann Landers: My twin sister and I were really close, but then we went into the same line of work and now we hate each other. What do I do? Signed, Abby.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Dear Abby, bite me.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Twin sisters Esther and Pauline Friedman became the two most famous advice columnists in America. But for years, they couldn't solve their own family dispute. The rival advice columnists sniped at each other in the press but they never spoke in person until they reconciled in the mid-'60s. Maybe. Because Dear Abby's daughter wrote a column in Ann Landers' memory when Landers died, but Landers' daughter said Abby's daughter just did that for the money. So it continued. You know, and then the two women started the yo momma jokes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You know.

ROCCA: And this is why print is dying.

SAGAL: Your momma would send an alcoholic to a distillery.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Your momma would tell John McCain to go to Alaska.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Carl, how did Natalie do on our quiz?

KASELL: Natalie had two correct answers, Peter, so I'll be doing the message on her home answering machine.

SAGAL: Well done.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: And thanks so much for playing.

TIPPETS: Oh, thank you.

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