Who Are The Remaining iTunes Holdouts? While the Beatles were perhaps the biggest holdout from the iTunes store, they were not the last. Host Melissa Block has a rundown of some major acts who continue to keep their songs off of iTunes.
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Who Are The Remaining iTunes Holdouts?

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Who Are The Remaining iTunes Holdouts?

Who Are The Remaining iTunes Holdouts?

Who Are The Remaining iTunes Holdouts?

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While the Beatles were perhaps the biggest holdout from the iTunes store, they were not the last. Host Melissa Block has a rundown of some major acts who continue to keep their songs off of iTunes.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

While The Beatles were the biggest iTunes holdouts, they were not the last. Several major acts continue to keep many - if not all - of their songs off Apple's virtual shelves. So if you're looking for Kid Rock or Bob Seger, you're better off at a brick-and-mortar store.

(Soundbite of song, "Old Time Rock 'n' Roll")

Mr. BOB SEGER (Singer): (Singing) Just take those old records off the shelf. I'll sit and listen to them by myself.

BLOCK: And the same goes for Def Leppard and AC/DC.

(Soundbite of song, "Back in Black")

AC/DC (Band): (Singing) Back in black. I hit the sack.

BLOCK: Now, for some of these artists, the issue is money. For the band Tool and for Garth Brooks, they simply want their music to stay in album form.

(Soundbite of song, "Long Neck Bottle ")

Mr. GARTH BROOKS (Singer): (Singing) There's a girl at home who loves me. You know she won't understand. Long neck bottle, let go of my hand.

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