Opening Panel Round Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Chinese leaders: They’re just like us! and a tweet that will live in infamy.
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Opening Panel Round

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Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

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Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Chinese leaders: They’re just like us! and a tweet that will live in infamy.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

We want to remind everybody that they can join us here most weeks at the Chase Bank Auditorium. For tickets and more information about shows here and our upcoming shows in Miami on February 3rd and 4th of 2011, go to chicagopublicradio.org, or you can find the link at our website, waitwait.npr.org.

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Maz, everybody knows China cracked down on Google recently, forbidding people from using it in that country. But until the cables released by WikiLeaks, no one knew why. What was the trigger for China's crackdown on Google?

MAZ JOBRANI: A government official read some insulting stuff when he Googled his own name.

SAGAL: That's exactly right, he Googled himself.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: According to the leaked cable, the country's senior propaganda official, Li Changchun, was appalled at what came up when he Googled himself. He did what many of us would do, if we could, he effectively shut down access to Google among everybody he knew.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You got to feel for the guy. It's hard dating in the age of Google if your China's senior propaganda official. You have a nice first date, you'd come home and you Google her. It's like oh, she likes jogging, she does 10ks. Whoa. She Googles you and finds: Represses the masses and imprisons dissidents.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: She's not calling you back, you know.

JOBRANI: Well, you can learn a lot about yourself by Googling yourself.

SAGAL: You really can.

JOBRANI: You're like, oh, I'm a jerk.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Maz, this week Newt Gingrich commemorated the 69th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor by reminding his Twitter followers the occasion was a good time to do what?

JOBRANI: Raise the flag?

SAGAL: No, no, no.

JOBRANI: No. Going the wrong way.

SAGAL: I'll give you a hint. He reminded them all that orders over $25 get free shipping.

JOBRANI: Buy his book?

SAGAL: Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Gingrich tweeted, quote, "The 69th anniversary of the Japanese attack is a good time to remind folks of our novels 'Pearl Harbor' and 'Days of Infamy.'" unquote. The tweet was immediately taken down after other Twitter users accused it of being tacky and in bad taste, to which Gingrich replied: If you want to see tack and bad taste, just check out my novels, 'Pearl Harbor' and 'Days of Infamy.'"

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROY BLOUNT JR: There's no such thing as a bad day to sell a book.

SAGAL: That's true.

AMY DICKINSON: That's right, baby.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: A little sympathy. A little sympathy for the Newtster.

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