Manhattan Transfer: Holidays In Harmony The long-running vocal jazz group brings its familiar harmonies to the studios of Jazz24 in Seattle.
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The Manhattan Transfer In Studio on Jazz24

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Manhattan Transfer: Holidays In Harmony

Manhattan Transfer: Holidays In Harmony

The Manhattan Transfer In Studio on Jazz24

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The Manhattan Transfer recently stopped by the Jazz24 studios in Seattle. Duncan P. Walker hide caption

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Duncan P. Walker

The Manhattan Transfer recently stopped by the Jazz24 studios in Seattle.

Duncan P. Walker

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The Manhattan Transfer In Studio on Jazz24

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The Manhattan Transfer In Studio on Jazz24

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The Manhattan Transfer In Studio on Jazz24

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When The Manhattan Transfer -- Tim Hauser, Cheryl Bentyne, Alan Paul and Janis Siegel -- came into the KPLU/Jazz24 performance studio, they'd just gotten off an airplane. A little jetlagged but ready to sing, they kicked off the session with their version of "Moten Swing." When the song was over, interviewer Abe Beeson asked, "Is it that easy, once a song starts, to get happy?" Their answer, as you’ll hear, was "Yes!"

For nearly 40 years, the group's love of music has kept The Manhattan Transfer happy -- and made it internationally famous. During the interview, Bentyne talked about being the newest member of the group (she's only been onboard for 32 years), and they all weighed in how important it is to make live jazz available to new generations of listeners.

Along with "Moten Swing," the group sang "I Know Why" and ended the performance with a hidden gem called "Foo-Gee," The Manhattan Transfer's tip of the hat to the doo-wop originals in The Ink Spots.