Book Review: Saul Bellow's 'Letters' Saul Bellow: Letters, edited by Benjamin Taylor, is a definitive collection of the correspondence of the Nobel Prize-winning novelist.
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Book Review: Saul Bellow's 'Letters'

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Book Review: Saul Bellow's 'Letters'

Book Review: Saul Bellow's 'Letters'

Book Review: Saul Bellow's 'Letters'

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Saul Bellow: Letters, edited by Benjamin Taylor, is a definitive collection of the correspondence of the Nobel Prize-winning novelist.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

Our reviewer, Alan Cheuse, has been reading a 600-page collection of the letters of novelist Saul Bellow.

ALAN CHEUSE: His devotion to his work is instructive for all writers, especially the young. The years go by, letters flow. Admiration and awards and sales replace adversity, and one marriage yields to another, but the wit sparks up all the same, even as Bellow shifts from aesthetic critiques of books by friends into writing their eulogies - eulogies for Bernard Malamud, Robert Penn Warren, Ralph Ellison among them.

SIEGEL: He might have been writing about himself, himself over whose shoulder you can read as he writes the letters in this important collection.

SIEGEL: "The Letters of Saul Bellow" is edited by Benjamin Taylor. Alan Cheuse teaches writing at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

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