Haitians Mark Anniversary Of Devastating Earthquake It's been one year since the magnitude 7 earthquake struck Haiti's capital, killing more than 200,000 people and leaving 1.5 million homeless. Reconstruction work has barely begun.
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Haitians Mark Anniversary Of Devastating Earthquake

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Haitians Mark Anniversary Of Devastating Earthquake

Haitians Mark Anniversary Of Devastating Earthquake

Haitians Mark Anniversary Of Devastating Earthquake

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/132854021/132854347" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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It's been one year since the magnitude 7 earthquake struck Haiti's capital, killing more than 200,000 people and leaving 1.5 million homeless. Reconstruction work has barely begun.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

NPR: Good morning.

JASON BEAUBIEN: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: Jason, 200,000 people died on this day a year ago today, how are Haitians marking this tragedy?

BEAUBIEN: MONTAGNE; And, Jason, you arrived there and begin reporting right after the earthquake. Remind us what it was like a year ago.

BEAUBIEN: A year later, things are obviously much better than that. But that was a day that Haitians say that they're never going to forget.

MONTAGNE: And what about today? When you walk around the city, what do you see?

BEAUBIEN: So there's a lot of frustration here with where things are right now, with a sense that people want to be moving forward faster than things moved over this last year.

MONTAGNE: Well, yesterday, former President Bill Clinton joined Haiti's prime minister to announce a new investment in Haiti. They say it will create thousands of jobs. Have business and commerce come back to life at all since the quake?

BEAUBIEN: In Port-au-Prince, commerce has come back in terms of a lot of the commerce that was always here, people doing things in the streets, people selling things. You know, right underneath some rubble that's about to - looks like it's about to fall over, you'll have women selling oranges and selling slippers and selling medicine. That kind of commerce has come back, but certainly, this is a difficult place to work. A lot of the infrastructure has been damaged and - you know, this country has a long, long way to go to getting back to normal.

MONTAGNE: And just very briefly, Jason, Haiti's recovery has been bedeviled by cholera and also political chaos. Is there any sense of optimism that things will get better any time soon?

BEAUBIEN: The big question is when will things get better? I think Haitians have confidence that, yes, things will get better, but the question is how long is that going to take.

MONTAGNE: Joining us from Port-au-Prince, NPR's Jason Beaubien, thanks very much.

BEAUBIEN: You're welcome.

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