Many In Egypt's Ancient Alexandria Support Mubarak Pro-Mubarak factions are gaining traction in Egypt's ancient Mediterranean city of Alexandria. It is visible on its walls. Parts of anti-Mubarak graffiti spray-painted in black onto one restaurant are now covered in red paint to create pro-Mubarak slogans.
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Many In Egypt's Ancient Alexandria Support Mubarak

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Many In Egypt's Ancient Alexandria Support Mubarak

Many In Egypt's Ancient Alexandria Support Mubarak

Many In Egypt's Ancient Alexandria Support Mubarak

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Pro-Mubarak factions are gaining traction in Egypt's ancient Mediterranean city of Alexandria. It is visible on its walls. Parts of anti-Mubarak graffiti spray-painted in black onto one restaurant are now covered in red paint to create pro-Mubarak slogans.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Travel on the Nile River from Cairo away from the protests in Tahrir Square and you come to the Nile River Delta. Near the mouth of the river on the Mediterranean coastline you come to the ancient city of Alexandria, home to thousands of years of history.

INSKEEP: Today, it is difficult to reach Alexandria. Egypt's transportation networks are severely disrupted. An NPR team made it to the city and found Egyptian soldiers guarding government buildings and key sites, including the city's famous library. Protests against President Hosni Mubarak have swept this city for days, but supporter of the president are gaining strength. Here's our correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.

(SOUNDBITE OF HORN HONKING)

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: Unidentified Man #1: (Foreign language spoken)

SARHADDI NELSON: None of these protestors hold up placards or flags that were common at earlier demonstrations. Their exhilaration at forcing Mubarak to agree to step down has evolved into frustration and rage over his refusal to leave more quickly. They rail against the killing of protestors in Cairo's Tahrir Square. One protestor is Khaled Sobhy.

KHALED SOBHY: Those are the people that need their liberty, because they feel they all live in a stupid system, in a very bad system, corrupted by the businessman and the businessman seek their interests only, not the interest of the citizen. Now we need a new government. We need a new police system in order to live better in the future.

SARHADDI NELSON: Unidentified Man #3: No, no, no.

SARHADDI NELSON: Unidentified Woman #2: (Foreign language spoken)

SARHADDI NELSON: A half-dozen or more protestors trail the journalists as they leave the square, following them back to the hotel. Among them is coffee shop owner Mohammed Abdel Hamid.

MOHAMMED ABDEL HAMID: We will continue our demonstrations against him, every day, every day. No way out, no way out. We will continue our good demonstration against him.

SARHADDI NELSON: Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson, NPR News, in Alexandria, Egypt.

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