Letters: Over The Rhine We update our report on lobbyists in Washington who are working on behalf of the Egyptian government. Also, listeners react to our conversation with the husband-and-wife duo Over the Rhine. Hosts Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read letters from our listeners.

Letters: Over The Rhine

Letters: Over The Rhine

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We update our report on lobbyists in Washington who are working on behalf of the Egyptian government. Also, listeners react to our conversation with the husband-and-wife duo Over the Rhine. Hosts Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read letters from our listeners.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

It's time now for your letters, and we begin with a disclosure that we should have noted. On Monday, we aired a report about lobbyists here in Washington who are working on behalf of the Egyptian government.

We said that the Mubarak regime has employed the powerful trio of Tony Podesta, Bob Livingston & Toby Moffett. Together, they make up the PLM Group.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

What we did not say in that story is that Podesta also has an ongoing contract with NPR, though not as part of the PLM Group. A separate entity, known as The Podesta Group, has been lobbying for NPR since May 2007. It is paid $120,000 dollars per year. The Egyptian government pays the PLM Group $1.1 million per year.

BLOCK: And now to your letters. We got a bunch about my conversation with Over the Rhine. The husband-and-wife, singer-songwriter duo from southern Ohio has a new album out. It's called "The Long Surrender."

(Soundbite of music)

OVER THE RHINE (Music Group): (Singing) I bring all our secrets for show and tell. We dragged each other through heaven and hell. It's our smoking gun, but hey, we're still alive. Baby, our love songs must survive.

BLOCK: Linford Detweiler and Karin Bergquist have been making music together for 20 years, but some listeners, like Cincinnati's Megan Lauer, were shocked to hear them on our air.

She writes: I have been listening to Over the Rhine for a few years and am used to hearing them on local radio, but national radio? What a treat.

SIEGEL: And Amanda Burk of Athens, Georgia writes this: Their music makes me shiver, tap my foot and cry. Their albums are sort of my church, where I go to be alone and sing my heart out with Karin. Discovering this band is like finding a four-leaf clover in a giant field. Each song of theirs is a little celebration or contemplation that just makes things better.

BLOCK: If you'd like to celebrate or contemplate something you hear on our air, you can write to us. Just go to npr.org, and click on Contact Us.

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