Egyptian Military Leaders Meet, Speak To Protesters The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces has been meeting Thursday amid speculation about the future of President Hosni Mubarak. Also, a general told protesters, "All your demands will be met today." It's not clear how the demands will be met; the central command has been for Mubarak's departure, which he has resisted.
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Egyptian Military Leaders Meet, Speak To Protesters

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Egyptian Military Leaders Meet, Speak To Protesters

Egyptian Military Leaders Meet, Speak To Protesters

Egyptian Military Leaders Meet, Speak To Protesters

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133654485/133654414" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces has been meeting Thursday amid speculation about the future of President Hosni Mubarak. Also, a general told protesters, "All your demands will be met today." It's not clear how the demands will be met; the central command has been for Mubarak's departure, which he has resisted.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The situation in Egypt may be changing today. It's important to stress what we do not know, as well as what we do. Egypt's military leaders, the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, has been meeting today. State TV showed images of that meeting, amid speculation about the future of president Hosni Mubarak. Also, a general told protestors, quote "all your demands will be met today."

We do not know how the demands will be met. The central demand, of course, has been for Mubarak's departure, which he's resisted. We'll bring you more as we learn it, right here on NPR News.

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