Foreign Policy: Why You Should Care About Egypt The uprising in Egypt thickens today after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's tacit refusal to step down from power. But if you think this doesn't matter to you, Stephen M. Walt of Foreign Policy offers 10 reasons, from the U.S. budget to Israel, from morality to Facebook, why Americans should be following the amazing events in Cairo.
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Foreign Policy: Why You Should Care About Egypt

Stephen M. Walt is a professor of international affairs at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government and a contributing editor at Foreign Policy.

If you're a reader of my blog, you probably care a lot about foreign policy and you've probably already been riveted by events in Egypt, including President Hosni Mubarak's latest attempt to cling to power by offering largely meaningless concessions. But maybe one of your friends has asked you why Americans should care at all about who is governing that country or why it matters what its political system is. Although I think one can exaggerate Egypt's importance to the United States, here are 10 reasons why Americans should care about what is happening there.

America's Reputation. Whatever strategic benefits the United States has received from the tacit alliance with Egypt (and there are some), it has also associated the country with a government that buggered elections, tortured its own people, suppressed free speech, and behaved in a lot of other unpleasant ways. Backing Mubarak at all costs thus made the United States look hypocritical at best and callous at worst. And that's why you might want to ask whether change is a good thing from America's point of view, to say nothing of the Egyptian people's. Behrouz Mehri /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Behrouz Mehri /AFP/Getty Images

America's Reputation. Whatever strategic benefits the United States has received from the tacit alliance with Egypt (and there are some), it has also associated the country with a government that buggered elections, tortured its own people, suppressed free speech, and behaved in a lot of other unpleasant ways. Backing Mubarak at all costs thus made the United States look hypocritical at best and callous at worst. And that's why you might want to ask whether change is a good thing from America's point of view, to say nothing of the Egyptian people's.

Behrouz Mehri /AFP/Getty Images

Read the other 9 reasons at Foreign Policy.