Officials: Somali Pirates Kill 4 American Hostages Amid negotiations between Somali pirates and American military officers aboard vessels trailing a hijacked yacht, four American hostages were killed.
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Officials: Somali Pirates Kill 4 American Hostages

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Officials: Somali Pirates Kill 4 American Hostages

Officials: Somali Pirates Kill 4 American Hostages

Officials: Somali Pirates Kill 4 American Hostages

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Amid negotiations between Somali pirates and American military officers aboard vessels trailing a hijacked yacht, four American hostages were killed.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from Nairobi.

FRANK LANGFITT: U.S. warships, including a destroyer, the USS Starrett, began shadowing the yacht called the Quest. Admiral Mark Fox, commander of the U.S. 5th Fleet, picks up the story from there.

MARK FOX: Several pirates appeared on deck and moved up to the bow with their hands in the air in surrender.

LANGFITT: Admiral Fox also said they found two pirates who had already been killed. He emphasized that U.S. Special Forces did not shoot those pirates, and had not tried to launch a rescue.

FOX: There were ongoing negotiations that had continued for a number of days, and all I can tell you factually is that there were two dead pirates when we came on board the vessel.

LANGFITT: Frank Langfitt, NPR News, Nairobi.

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