Minks: Falling In Love And Faded Nostalgia In "Kusmi," the members of Minks disguise their broken hearts and put a happy face on their yearning. That may be a well-trod pop-music trope, but it's executed with charm and feeling.
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'Kusmi' by Minks

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Minks: Falling In Love And Faded Nostalgia

Review

Minks: Falling In Love And Faded Nostalgia

'Kusmi' by Minks

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In "Kusmi," the members of Minks disguise their broken hearts and put a happy face on their yearning. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

In "Kusmi," the members of Minks disguise their broken hearts and put a happy face on their yearning.

Courtesy of the artist

Friday's Pick

Song: "Kusmi"

Artist: Minks

CD: By the Hedge

Genre: Rock

The world isn't suffering from a shortage of new rock bands that create unrelentingly brooding, angst-freighted music. And with songs titled "Life at Dusk," "Funeral Song" and "Cemetary Rain" [sic], many might expect the same from Minks. Instead, the Brooklyn duo finds a balance between melancholy and day-dreamy romanticism, as it establishes a gothic, moody take on familiar boy-girl pop vocal harmonies.

On their debut, By the Hedge, singer-guitarist Sean Kilfoyle and singer Amalie Bruun sing of summer, falling in love and faded nostalgia. But Minks' members also offset those themes with a thick fog of noise and echoes that linger in corners of the songs' arrangements. That hazy atmosphere is as much an instrument as those that make up Minks' sound, and it tinges the band's songs with understated sadness.

With an unabashedly catchy hook and a buoyant bass line, "Kusmi" is the album's brightest and sweetest song. Kilfoyle and Bruun's voices ring out amidst messy guitar static and effervescent synths that render their words nearly indecipherable. But in spite of that, it's clear that they're disguising their broken hearts and putting a happy face on their yearning. That may be a well-trod pop-music trope, but it's executed with charm and feeling.