Bangladesh Ousts Bank's Famed Founder Mohammad Yunus won the Nobel peace prize in 2006 for his pioneering work in lending to the poor. The Bangladesh government has ordered him removed as head of the bank he founded, saying that at age 70 he was past the country's retirement age.
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Bangladesh Ousts Bank's Famed Founder

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Bangladesh Ousts Bank's Famed Founder

Bangladesh Ousts Bank's Famed Founder

Bangladesh Ousts Bank's Famed Founder

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/134221990/134221967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Mohammad Yunus won the Nobel peace prize in 2006 for his pioneering work in lending to the poor. The Bangladesh government has ordered him removed as head of the bank he founded, saying that at age 70 he was past the country's retirement age.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's business news starts with a Nobel Laureate battling his government.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: Muhammad Yunus won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for his pioneering work in lending to the poor, and now he's fighting the Bangladesh government that's trying to oust him from the bank he founded. Yunus established the Grameen Bank three decades ago and it makes small loans to poor, mostly women. Yesterday, the government ordered him removed as head of the bank, saying that at the age 70, he was past the country's retirement age.

Supporters say the move is political and today Yunus launched a court case in an attempt to reverse the governments move.

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