U.S. Says Missing Former FBI Agent Is Alive Evidence emerged recently that former FBI agent Robert Levinson, who disappeared in Iran four years ago, is alive. The U.S. government says he is being held somewhere in Southwest Asia. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is appealing to Iran to secure his release.
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U.S. Says Missing Former FBI Agent Is Alive

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U.S. Says Missing Former FBI Agent Is Alive

U.S. Says Missing Former FBI Agent Is Alive

U.S. Says Missing Former FBI Agent Is Alive

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/134253838/134253824" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Evidence emerged recently that former FBI agent Robert Levinson, who disappeared in Iran four years ago, is alive. The U.S. government says he is being held somewhere in Southwest Asia. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is appealing to Iran to secure his release.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

We do not know all the facts surrounding a former FBI agent who's been missing but what we do know this morning is tantalizing enough. Robert Levinson disappeared four years ago while traveling in Iran. Now the State Department and members of his family say they have received what they call proof that he's alive. NPR's Mike Shuster has more.

MIKE SHUSTER: But Levinson's case has been unique. There has not been any information to emerge since his disappearance.

A: Mike Shuster, NPR News, Baghdad.

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