Video Game Promotion Goes Over Like A Lead Balloon The video game industry was in San Francisco this week for a big conference. One company had the bright idea of promoting an upcoming game by releasing 10,000 red balloons across the city. The stunt did not fly well. Many of the balloons ended up in San Francisco Bay, and local environmentalists railed against the environmental damage.
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Video Game Promotion Goes Over Like A Lead Balloon

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Video Game Promotion Goes Over Like A Lead Balloon

Video Game Promotion Goes Over Like A Lead Balloon

Video Game Promotion Goes Over Like A Lead Balloon

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/134253862/134253831" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The video game industry was in San Francisco this week for a big conference. One company had the bright idea of promoting an upcoming game by releasing 10,000 red balloons across the city. The stunt did not fly well. Many of the balloons ended up in San Francisco Bay, and local environmentalists railed against the environmental damage.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

The video game industry gathered in San Francisco this week for a big conference. And one company had the bright idea of promoting an upcoming game by releasing 10,000 red balloons over the city. The stunt did not fly well.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

The game company, called THQ, said the balloons are, quote, "100 percent organic," and quote, "completely biodegradable."

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news from MORNING EDITION, on NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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