Out Of Prison, 'Spam King' Reboots Reputation After nearly four years in prison, the man dubbed by federal prosecutors as the "Spam King" is back online, trying to build a new reputation. Robert Soloway went to prison in 2008 for spamming, mail fraud and tax violations. He told Wired magazine he wants to devote his life to teaching people how to avoid cybercrime.
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Out Of Prison, 'Spam King' Reboots Reputation

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Out Of Prison, 'Spam King' Reboots Reputation

Out Of Prison, 'Spam King' Reboots Reputation

Out Of Prison, 'Spam King' Reboots Reputation

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/134253882/134232694" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After nearly four years in prison, the man dubbed by federal prosecutors as the "Spam King" is back online, trying to build a new reputation. Robert Soloway went to prison in 2008 for spamming, mail fraud and tax violations. He told Wired magazine he wants to devote his life to teaching people how to avoid cybercrime.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

If his name doesn't ring a bell, you may know him better as the Spam King.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

That's the nickname he got from federal prosecutors. Soloway went to prison in 2008 for spamming, mail fraud and tax violations. He admitted to sending more than 10 trillion spam emails, and made a living showing others how to sell Viagra and other products online. At one time, the Spam King made $20,000 a day from his underground operation. He wore Prada and drove Porsches.

INSKEEP: Probation officers will monitor every email he sends and every website he visits for the next three years.

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