Soldiers In Yemen Fire At Protesting Students For weeks, people in Yemen have been protesting against the long rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Soldiers fired rubber bullets and tear gas at students camped at a university in the capital Tuesday. That confrontation came after thousands of inmates rioted at a nearby prison and called for the president to step down.
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Soldiers In Yemen Fire At Protesting Students

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Soldiers In Yemen Fire At Protesting Students

Soldiers In Yemen Fire At Protesting Students

Soldiers In Yemen Fire At Protesting Students

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/134385930/134384838" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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For weeks, people in Yemen have been protesting against the long rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Soldiers fired rubber bullets and tear gas at students camped at a university in the capital Tuesday. That confrontation came after thousands of inmates rioted at a nearby prison and called for the president to step down.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

And now we have an update now on another Arab country in turmoil. For weeks, people in Yemen have been protesting against the long rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Yesterday, soldiers fired rubber bullets and tear gas at students who were camped at a university in the capital.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

That confrontation came after thousands of inmates rioted at a nearby prison and called for the president to step down.

SHAPIRO: President Saleh has held power for 32 years. He recently pledged not to run for re-election in 2013. But the protesters say they want him to leave office now.

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