Google's April Fools' Day Joke May Be On Google On Friday, Google announced it would be offering gesture-driven email. Michele Norris says the news ended up being an April Fools' Day prank, but some California researchers may have the last laugh.
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Google's April Fools' Day Joke May Be On Google

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Google's April Fools' Day Joke May Be On Google

Google's April Fools' Day Joke May Be On Google

Google's April Fools' Day Joke May Be On Google

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135121159/135111245" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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On Friday, Google announced it would be offering gesture-driven email. Michele Norris says the news ended up being an April Fools' Day prank, but some California researchers may have the last laugh.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

Imagine being able to write an email by getting out of your chair and - say, waving your hands. To send a message, pretend you're licking a stamp and putting it on an imaginary envelope. Well, Google announced just that on Friday, calling the breakthrough Gmail Motion.

U: Our bodies did not evolve to sit at a desk in a rigid position all day. And it is my feeling that Gmail Motion will free the regular user.

NORRIS: In a video they posted online, you can watch someone actually composing an email using body motion.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

U: And so now, finally, the last step is, I want to send off this message. So I'm going to lick the stamp and send it. That's it.

NORRIS: The technology itself is still considered experimental, so don't throw out your keyboard or your office chair just yet.

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