Obama, Congressional Leaders Meet For Budget Talks Renee Montagne talks with NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson for the latest on the federal budget fight.
NPR logo

Obama, Congressional Leaders Meet For Budget Talks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135135572/135135524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Obama, Congressional Leaders Meet For Budget Talks

Obama, Congressional Leaders Meet For Budget Talks

Obama, Congressional Leaders Meet For Budget Talks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135135572/135135524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Renee Montagne talks with NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson for the latest on the federal budget fight.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

MONTAGNE: Good morning, Mara.

MARA LIASSON: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: Where are the two sides on these budget talks? And I'm thinking, really, first, this current-year budget. And will there be a shutdown?

LIASSON: Can he get his troops in line? How many Republican votes is he willing to do without in the House to pass this? There was some talk yesterday of the Republicans would get another temporary weeklong funding measure together, to go for another week. But everybody has said that they don't want to do that again. They want to get the rest of the year solved. So we really don't know what's going to happen.

MONTAGNE: Now, Mara, if there is a shutdown, which party would you expect would get the blame for that?

LIASSON: So you can see the real difference between the bases of both parties.

MONTAGNE: Okay, so the Republican House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan is announcing his budget today for the next fiscal year. That's 2012. There's some very large changes he's proposing.

LIASSON: But the big point is is that he takes on entitlements, and he's the first person in and Congress to actually present a plan to do that.

MONTAGNE: NPR's Mara Liasson, thanks very much.

LIASSON: Thank you.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.