Shares Could Be Offered In Empire State Building The family that controls the Empire State Building wants to include the art deco landmark in a new publicly traded real estate company, according to The New York Times. If so, the public would be able to be shares.
NPR logo

Shares Could Be Offered In Empire State Building

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135372926/135372849" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Shares Could Be Offered In Empire State Building

Shares Could Be Offered In Empire State Building

Shares Could Be Offered In Empire State Building

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135372926/135372849" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The family that controls the Empire State Building wants to include the art deco landmark in a new publicly traded real estate company, according to The New York Times. If so, the public would be able to be shares.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

New York is one place real estate is looking up. And those of you who want a piece of the action, look no further than the city's most famous skyscraper. The New York Times reports the family that controls the Empire State Building wants to include that art deco landmark in a new publicly traded real estate company so people can buy shares. Shares and a $20 elevator ticket will get you a trip to the top.

It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.