The Secret Weapon Of The Royal Family's Mystique How British royals manage to maintain their popularity among commoners despite divorces, sex scandals and inappropriate outfits? Essayist Diane Roberts thinks it's the tiaras.
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The Secret Weapon Of The Royal Family's Mystique

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The Secret Weapon Of The Royal Family's Mystique

The Secret Weapon Of The Royal Family's Mystique

The Secret Weapon Of The Royal Family's Mystique

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135678949/135679020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How British royals manage to maintain their popularity among commoners despite divorces, sex scandals and inappropriate outfits? Essayist Diane Roberts thinks it's the tiaras.

LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Much of the world will be in front of the television to see Kate Middleton wed Prince William. Essayist Diane Roberts will be among them. She's had practice watching royals.

DIANE ROBERTS: I think it's the tiaras. There's something both completely absurd and completely gorgeous about wearing a big old mess of diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds on your head. Miss America looks good in a tiara. Your seven-year- old niece looks good in a tiara. Kate Middleton will look good in a tiara as she walks down the aisle of the Abbey, preparing for a lifetime as a beautiful anachronism.

HANSEN: Diane Roberts practices her court curtsy in Tallahassee, Florida.

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