Your Letters: Gas Prices; Betty White Last week Liane spoke with energy analyst Phil Flynn about the impact of gas prices on the behavior of American consumers. Also, our chat with grand dame Betty White brought laughs to listeners of many generations. Host Liane Hansen reads listener's e-mails and comments about last week's program.
NPR logo

Your Letters: Gas Prices; Betty White

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136328601/136328582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Your Letters: Gas Prices; Betty White

Your Letters: Gas Prices; Betty White

Your Letters: Gas Prices; Betty White

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136328601/136328582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Last week Liane spoke with energy analyst Phil Flynn about the impact of gas prices on the behavior of American consumers. Also, our chat with grand dame Betty White brought laughs to listeners of many generations. Host Liane Hansen reads listener's e-mails and comments about last week's program.

LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Now to your comments. Last week, I spoke with energy analyst Phil Flynn about the impact of gas prices on the behavior of American consumers. For example, considering a smaller, more fuel-efficient car. That conversation generated lots of emails and posts at NPR.org.

F: The question should be: at what point will gas prices make you seek alternate transportation? I live 20 miles from work and I think if gas prices stayed in the $5 to $6 range I would consider moving closer to work and/or take the bus.

HANSEN: At what point will gas prices make me walk or bike? At the point where it stops being eight degrees in the winter and 98 degrees in the summer. Unfortunately, until that happens, many places in the country are simply not built for walking/biking cultures. I wish it weren't so.

HANSEN: The Ultimate Guide for Cool Aunts, Great-Aunts, Godmothers and All Women Who Love Kids." Erin Bell is an aunt to many and posted this comment: Some of my nieces and nephews have dealt with their parents divorcing, some with chronic illness and sometimes they just get overwhelmed by the continued presence of their parents and need another perspective. They need to know that they can get that from other women and men in their lives who love them, and whom their parents trust to keep the child's best interests and the parents' best intentions at heart.

HANSEN: I don't think there is such a thing as too much love or support. Our kids need as much positive adult influence as they can get. Thanks, Melanie, for making us mindful of the American family village and for supporting those who participate in it.

HANSEN: Well, we treasure your thoughts, comments and suggestions. Go to NPR.org and click on the Contact Us link. You can also post a comment on Facebook or Twitter - both @NPRWeekend.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

HANSEN: This is NPR News.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.