Judge: Tattoo Suit Won't Delay 'Hangover' Opening The Hangover: Part II was targeted in a copyright lawsuit involving a tattoo. The designer said he did not give Warner Bros. permission to use its likeness in the movie, and so he tried to block the film from opening. But a judge ruled this week that doing so could potentially harm movie theaters.
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Judge: Tattoo Suit Won't Delay 'Hangover' Opening

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Judge: Tattoo Suit Won't Delay 'Hangover' Opening

Judge: Tattoo Suit Won't Delay 'Hangover' Opening

Judge: Tattoo Suit Won't Delay 'Hangover' Opening

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136669785/135843705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Hangover: Part II was targeted in a copyright lawsuit involving a tattoo. The designer said he did not give Warner Bros. permission to use its likeness in the movie, and so he tried to block the film from opening. But a judge ruled this week that doing so could potentially harm movie theaters.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And our last word in business today is: Another hangover.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "THE HANGOVER")

ED HELMS: Unidentified Man (Actor): (as character) You don't remember nothing?

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

And I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TYSON'S TIGER SONG")

HELMS: (as Stu) (Singing) Don't you worry your pretty, striped head. We're gonna get you back to Tyson and your cozy tiger bed. And they we're gonna find our best friend Doug, and then we're gonna give him a best-friend hug. Doug, Doug. Oh, Doug, Dougie, Dougie, Doug, Doug.

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