Letters: Mountaineering Ranger; Obama's Golf Foursome Robert Siegel reads letters from listeners about mountaineering ranger Tucker Chenoweth; and President Obama's golf round with Republican House Speaker John Boehner, Vice President Joe Biden and Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich.
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Letters: Mountaineering Ranger; Obama's Golf Foursome

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Letters: Mountaineering Ranger; Obama's Golf Foursome

Letters: Mountaineering Ranger; Obama's Golf Foursome

Letters: Mountaineering Ranger; Obama's Golf Foursome

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137254038/137254025" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Robert Siegel reads letters from listeners about mountaineering ranger Tucker Chenoweth; and President Obama's golf round with Republican House Speaker John Boehner, Vice President Joe Biden and Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Time now for your email to our program.

Yesterday, we heard about a dramatic rescue - or should we say rescues - on Mount McKinley in Alaska. Mountaineering Ranger Tucker Chenoweth rescued not one, not two, but three separate climbers in just one night.

Listener Diane Calenna(ph), of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, wrote to ask how all those rescued climbers are faring. I assume all are alive and recovering from their altitude sickness, she writes.

Well, Mr. Chenoweth did tell us about their conditions.

Mr. TUCKER CHENOWETH (Ranger, National Park Service): They're all making good recoveries. You know, it's kind of the miraculous thing about high-altitude -they get down to lower elevation and they start feeling a whole lot better. So I think we timed it right. I don't think there will be any lasting effects on these guys. They didn't have any frostbite or other injuries, and that was probably just because of the speed at which everything took place.

SIEGEL: One of the rescued people went home right away. We've learned the other two were released from the hospital.

Now on to some other mail. Yesterday, I talked with Peter Finch, an editor at Golf Digest. This, as President Obama, Vice President Biden, House Speaker Boehner and Ohio Governor Kasich prepared to tee-off tomorrow. So, Finch offered some tips for conducting business on the golf course.

Mr. PETER FINCH (Editor, Golf Digest): I think it makes it much easier to approach somebody and to talk to them about things that you want to accomplish together after you've played that around.

SIEGEL: Well, Al Arismandez(ph), of Redondo Beach, California, writes to say that he has completed deals on the golf course and he offers this advice: Once you've cheered or applauded a successful golf shot of a playing partner, or commiserated with them in a poorly executed one, there is a quick if not deep look into that golfer's humanity. That's the kind of insight and understanding that can go a long way, much longer than my tee shot on hole number one.

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