Gov. Brown To Sign Pared-Down Calif. Budget Deal Lawmakers in California have agreed to a new budget. The legislature has sent Gov. Jerry Brown a nearly $86 billion spending plan that begins Friday. The governor is expected to sign the measure.
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Gov. Brown To Sign Pared-Down Calif. Budget Deal

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Gov. Brown To Sign Pared-Down Calif. Budget Deal

Gov. Brown To Sign Pared-Down Calif. Budget Deal

Gov. Brown To Sign Pared-Down Calif. Budget Deal

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137491245/137491255" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Lawmakers in California have agreed to a new budget. The legislature has sent Gov. Jerry Brown a nearly $86 billion spending plan that begins Friday. The governor is expected to sign the measure.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

As John Myers of member station KQED reports, finally getting a budget at all has brought no jubilation, but at least some relief.

JOHN MYERS: California faced a $26 billion budget hole when Jerry Brown took office in January. The hole was created by a long-term imbalance of taxes and spending and exacerbated by a floundering economy. But in the fiscal year that begins Friday, Brown and his fellow Democrats in the state's legislature are banking on hope that a recent uptick in tax revenues will bring in an unexpected seven-and-a-half billion dollars.

JERRY BROWN: We do expect more revenues in the budget year coming up. But in case we're overoptimistic, we have severe trigger cuts that will be triggered and go into effect.

MYERS: Still, California's biggest budget solution is less spending, to the tune of $15 billion.

DARRELL STEINBERG: This budget is the most austere fiscal blueprint California's seen in more than a generation.

MYERS: Democrat Darrell Steinberg is the leader of the California State Senate.

STEINBERG: Spending levels are at historic lows. And every sector of society will feel the difficult choices we've made to bring the budget into balance.

MYERS: Republicans, like state Senator Bob Huff, says the budget now in place proves those taxes were never really needed.

BOB HUFF: If we now have the revenue that we needed at the beginning of the year, why is it we keep going back to the voters and asking for yet more?

MYERS: For NPR News, I'm John Myers, in Sacramento.

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