Prosecutors Strike Out, Clemens Walks For Now Judge Reggie Walton has declared a mistrial in the Roger Clemens case. Walton ruled that prosecutors had indelibly tainted Clemens' ability to get a fair trial by exposing the jury to inadmissible evidence. Clemens was on trial on charges of lying to Congress about using performance-enhancing drugs.
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Prosecutors Strike Out, Clemens Walks For Now

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Prosecutors Strike Out, Clemens Walks For Now

Law

Prosecutors Strike Out, Clemens Walks For Now

Prosecutors Strike Out, Clemens Walks For Now

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Judge Reggie Walton has declared a mistrial in the Roger Clemens case. Walton ruled that prosecutors had indelibly tainted Clemens' ability to get a fair trial by exposing the jury to inadmissible evidence. Clemens was on trial on charges of lying to Congress about using performance-enhancing drugs.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

The perjury trial of former pitching star Roger Clemens has blown up. On just the second day of the trial, Judge Reggie Walton declared a mistrial. He says prosecutors indelibly tainted Clemens' ability to get a fair trial by exposing the jury to inadmissible evidence. It is not yet clear whether prosecutors will get a second chance. NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg has our story this morning.

NINA TOTENBERG: Nina Totenberg, NPR News, Washington.

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