Summer Sounds: Swimming Pool Listener Carol Tanis recalls the lure of a neighbor's unapproachable swimming pool — and the Summer Sounds that taunted her.

Summer Sounds: Swimming Pool

Summer Sounds: Swimming Pool

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Listener Carol Tanis recalls the lure of a neighbor's unapproachable swimming pool — and the Summer Sounds that taunted her.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

The weather's not quite as brutal this week, but it's still pretty hot in much of the country, which is why we are heading to the pool for today's Summer Sound.

(SOUNDBITE MONTAGE)

M: The unmistakable splash of water when someone does a cannonball, dive or belly flop into the pool is the sound of summer for me.

(SOUNDBITE OF WATER SPLASHING)

M: Now, as an adult, I live in a condo complex that has - guess what? a pool. Now, I get to frolic in the water. I might join the neighbor kids in a splash match or two. I've even learned how to play Marco Polo. Sometimes, I might even have the pool to myself and make some extra splashes just because I can. And it might even be that I splash around on - yes, a Sunday afternoon.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPLASHING)

SIEGEL: Carol Tanis, with her choice of summer sounds.

MICHELE NORRIS: Alicia Ford of Nashville, Tennessee, also told us about what the sound of the pool means to her. She writes: It takes me to a time when I wasn't responsible for anybody, and it was completely developmentally appropriate to be self-centered - 14 years old. It's a time when none of those kids in the pool were my own. I didn't have to be on alert for mean kids, rogue poo, or to try to save anyone from drowning.

SIEGEL: We've enjoyed hearing the memories triggered by your summer sounds. Thanks for sending them in.

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