Dominique Strauss-Kahn's Accuser Goes Public The hotel housekeeper at the center of the sexual assault case against Dominique Strauss-Kahn has come forward publicly for the first time since the alleged attack at the Sofitel Hotel. Legal experts talk about her appearance on ABC's Good Morning America and interview with Newsweek magazine.
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Dominique Strauss-Kahn's Accuser Goes Public

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Dominique Strauss-Kahn's Accuser Goes Public

Dominique Strauss-Kahn's Accuser Goes Public

Dominique Strauss-Kahn's Accuser Goes Public

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The hotel housekeeper at the center of the sexual assault case against Dominique Strauss-Kahn has come forward publicly for the first time since the alleged attack at the Sofitel Hotel. Legal experts talk about her appearance on ABC's Good Morning America and interview with Newsweek magazine.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

As Ailsa Chang of member station WNYC reports, legal experts are mixed over the wisdom of her decision to sit down with ABC's "Good Morning America" and Newsweek magazine.

AILSA CHANG: After Strauss-Kahn's DNA was found on Nafissatou Diallo's housekeeping uniform, and in the Sofitel hotel suite where he allegedly attacked her, the defense has continually suggested well, there's a reason for that. Diallo consented to a sexual encounter. But on ABC's "Good Morning America" today, she says that's a lie.

NORRIS: I was like, stop. Stop this. Stop this. But he won't say nothing. He keep pushing me, pushing me to the hallway.

CHANG: Some legal experts, though, say it's a clever way to reinforce her credibility about the actual attack. Jim Cohen is a professor of criminal law at Fordham Law School in New York.

P: On this particular matter, she came across - and intended to come across - as a truth teller. And she wanted to send that message both to the prosecutors and to the public.

CHANG: But Jane Manning, who's a former sex crimes prosecutor in New York City, says Diallo could be setting herself up to be impeached on the witness stand.

NORRIS: Even a person who's telling an absolutely true narrative will not tell it the same way twice. And when the case goes to trial, a skillful cross-examiner can highlight those very small differences and really make them seem like major inconsistencies.

CHANG: For NPR News, I'm Ailsa Chang in New York.

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