Opening Panel Round Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: China Dismantles the Flux Capacitor; Daughters, Lock Up Your Mothers!
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Opening Panel Round

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Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

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Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: China Dismantles the Flux Capacitor; Daughters, Lock Up Your Mothers!

PETER SAGAL, Host:

We want to remind everybody to join us here most weeks at the Chase Bank Auditorium. For tickets and more information, go to wbez.org and you can find a link at our website, waitwait.npr.org. Right now, Panel, some more questions for you from the week's news.

Kyrie, after years of research, Chinese scientists say they are confident that what is impossible?

KYRIE O: Time travel.

SAGAL: Yes, very good. Time travel is impossible.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Bad news, nerds. Time travel, according to Chinese scientists is and always will be impossible, which explains why your future self has never appeared to give you the secret of talking to girls.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The discovery has to do with the fact that photons will never exceed the speed of light, and that prevents time travel because, you see, without hyper light speed photons, the flux capacitor can never reserve the polarity of the wormhole.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Meaning, no, you're never going to be able to kill Hitler, or more importantly, go back to fifth grade and kick Danny Menozi's butt because now finally, you're bigger than he is.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LUKE BURBANK: That would just be assault.

SAGAL: Yeah, I know.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: Like a grownup shows up in 1974 and punches a kid.

SAGAL: And he's like no, I'm from the future. This is fine.

BURBANK: Yeah.

SAGAL: I've waited my whole life to do this.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They'd never believe you. Kyrie, according to a new study, there's a new fashion trend among mothers. They're dressing like whom?

CONNOR: Is this someone slightly younger than they are?

SAGAL: Yes.

CONNOR: Their children?

SAGAL: Yes, their teenage daughters in fact.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

ROY BLOUNT: Oh no.

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SAGAL: A new study in the Journal of Consumer Behavior finds more and more mothers dressing like their teenage daughters, in a misguided attempt to look and feel younger. The study has not yet determined which party this trend embarrasses more.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: One research said that moms mimic their daughters because it's, "like a shortcut to what is hip and cool." A comment met by all teenage girls slamming their doors in unison.

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CONNOR: I do think there should be a store called Forever 41.

SAGAL: Yes, exactly.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

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