Limericks Carl reads three news-related limericks: Ooh, That Smell, Snail Ale, and A Toothy Economic Indicator.
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Limericks

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Limericks

Limericks

Limericks

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Carl reads three news-related limericks: Ooh, That Smell, Snail Ale, and A Toothy Economic Indicator.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank. But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. Call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait-wait, that's 1-888-924-8924, or you can click the contact us link on our website. That's waitwait.npr.org, there you can find out about attending our weekly live shows here at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago, and you can check out the latest How to do Everything podcast from the producers of WAIT WAIT. This week, how to run far without getting tired. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME.

ANTHONY BRINDISI: Hi, this is Anthony Brindisi, calling from Grand Island, New York.

SAGAL: Hey, where is Grand Island, New York?

BRINDISI: It is right between Buffalo and Niagara Falls on Niagara River.

SAGAL: Oh there you are. So you're out on the river there. It must be beautiful.

BRINDISI: Yeah, you know, you go jump in the river, about two hours, you go over the falls.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Have you done it?

BRINDISI: I'm thinking about trying it this weekend.

SAGAL: There you go. Well, welcome to the show, Anthony. Carl Kasell right now is going to perform for you three news-related limericks with the last word or phrase missing from each. If you can fill in that last word or phrase correctly on two of the limericks, you will be a winner. Ready to play?

BRINDISI: Sounds good.

SAGAL: Here's your first limerick.

CARL KASELL, Host:

For Anheuser-Bush, it's a plug. Shell-less mollusks consumer with a glug. They think microbrews are a bit of a snooze. No, Bud is a beer for a?

BRINDISI: Bug.

SAGAL: Close. More snail-like.

BRINDISI: Oh, slug.

SAGAL: Yes, a slug.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Very good.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Gardeners know slugs are attracted to beer, but only Kathryn Olmstead, a writer and professor in Maine, bothered to ask which beer they prefer.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: She gave her garden slugs a selection of domestic and foreign beers and the slugs overwhelmingly chose Budweiser.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: True fact. Except for one pretentious slug who's like, "do you have any top fermented ales?"

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And the other slugs threw him out of the frat. Whatever they drink though, those slugs, the party is over as soon as they reach for the salted nuts.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Here is your next limerick.

KASELL: This pit stain stench makes my eyes blink, so I'm soaking this shirt in the sink. But some other clothes aren't offending my nose. See, they only get washed when they?

BRINDISI: Stink.

SAGAL: Yes, indeed.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: A new study showed this week that more than half of men use the "sniff test" to determine whether they should wear their clothing again, believing that large food stains, wrinkles and the same of being seen in the same shirt every day for two weeks are less reliable indicators.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The system works okay but can be confusing. It's not okay to wear a shirt even if the food stuck to it still tastes okay.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: I will say, and this may be more than you wanted to know, but I read this story and I was like, but wait a minute, how else do you find out if your clothes are clean enough to wear?

KYRIE O: If you've worn them...

SAGAL: That's crazy though, it's perfectly good.

ROY BLOUNT: Yeah, I mean I don't even like to change clothes, much less...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Very good, here is your last limerick.

KASELL: We fairies have learned a harsh truth. This economy bites. It's uncouth. Our funds are quite strapped, so if chipped, filled or capped, we're giving less cash for each?

BRINDISI: Tooth.

SAGAL: Yes, tooth.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: A new survey has shown that in these hard economic times, kids are getting shortchanged by the tooth fairy. On average, kids get about three bucks a tooth, but that amount has shrunk to $2.60 over the past year. Kids are complaining, but hey, the fairy's got to make some cuts where she can. If things get really bad, they'll put their tooth under the pillow at night, only to wake up and find a slightly nicer tooth.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Carl, how did Anthony do on our quiz?

KASELL: Anthony had a perfect game, Peter. Anthony, you had three correct answers, so I'll be doing the message on your voicemail.

SAGAL: Well done, congratulations.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you so much. Thanks for playing.

BRINDISI: All right, thank you.

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