Prediction Now that McDonalds has added apples to their Happy Meals, our panelists predict what the fast food giant will do to attract moms next.
NPR logo

Prediction

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/138836747/138836899" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Prediction

Prediction

Prediction

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/138836747/138836899" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Now that McDonalds has added apples to their Happy Meals, our panelists predict what the fast food giant will do to attract moms next.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

Now, panel, what is the next thing McDonald's will do to attract those moms? Luke Burbank?

LUKE BURBANK: Starting with fewer TV commercials encouraging their kids to sit on the lap of a strange clown.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Kyrie O'Connor?

KYRIE O: White wine, free refills.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: And Roy Blount, Jr.?

ROY BLOUNT: Well, you know, the drive by receiver where you call in your order?

SAGAL: Yeah.

BLOUNT: They won't take your order until you call your mother first.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

CARL KASELL, Host:

Well, if McDonald's does any of those things, panel, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME.

SAGAL: Thank you, Carl Kasell. Thanks also to Luke Burbank, Kyrie O'Connor and Roy Blount, Jr.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thanks to all of you for listening. I'm Peter Sagal. We'll see you right back here next week.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: This is NPR.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.