Woman Treks The Appalachian In Record 46 Days People sometimes spend six months hiking the Appalachian trail, but Jennifer Pharr Davis hiked the whole thing in record time: from Maine to Georgia in just under 46 1/2 days, beating the old record by about a day. She walked more than 2,000 miles, about 47 miles per day — and spotted 36 bears.
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Woman Treks The Appalachian In Record 46 Days

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Woman Treks The Appalachian In Record 46 Days

Woman Treks The Appalachian In Record 46 Days

Woman Treks The Appalachian In Record 46 Days

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/138947220/138947247" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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People sometimes spend six months hiking the Appalachian trail, but Jennifer Pharr Davis hiked the whole thing in record time: from Maine to Georgia in just under 46 1/2 days, beating the old record by about a day. She walked more than 2,000 miles, about 47 miles per day — and spotted 36 bears.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

People sometimes spend six months hiking the Appalachian Trail, but Jennifer Pharr Davis walked the whole thing in record time. She traveled a path from Maine to Georgia and she did it in just under 46 1/2 days. That beats the old record by a day. She walked more than 2,000 miles, about 47 miles per day. We do not know what motivates a hiker to move so swiftly, but we do know she spotted 36 bears.

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