Panel Questions Questions for the panel: Reality Bites; Food Snob: The Next Generation; the iEconomy; and A Daring Chef.
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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Questions for the panel: Reality Bites; Food Snob: The Next Generation; the iEconomy; and A Daring Chef.

CARL KASELL, Host:

From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Amy Dickinson, Mo Rocca and Charlie Pierce. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

Thank you, Carl.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you so much. In just a minute, it was touch and go there for a while, but Carl has successfully raised the Rhyme Ceiling.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It means we won't default on our limericks. If you'd like to play, even after hearing that, give us a call at 1-888-Wait-Wait. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news.

Mo, we all know it's tough to lose weight, but thanks to researchers at Clemson University, there's a new device that may finally help. What is it?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MO ROCCA: Oh gosh, is it like piranhas?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: It's something that gets...

SAGAL: The carnivorous fish diet. Put these in your bathtub; you'll be thinner in no time.

ROCCA: Okay, so something that makes you lose weight very easily.

SAGAL: Well, it helps people lose weight. It's a device.

AMY DICKINSON: A tapeworm.

ROCCA: It's a device.

SAGAL: It's not a tapeworm, Amy.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: It's a device.

SAGAL: It's a pedometer, sort of like a pedometer, but it's for the part of your body that people...

ROCCA: Your jaw.

SAGAL: Almost. It is in fact a bite counter.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: It doesn't actually affix to your face. You wear it like a watch, you see, and a sensor inside tracks how many times your hand makes the trip from your mouth to the plate or to the bag of potato chips, or to the garbage can to get that last tater tot your wife foolishly didn't eat.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: Wait a minute, I'm a huge masticator. So, I mean, is it the number of times you chew?

SAGAL: No, no, it has nothing to do with how much you chew. It's how many times you reach for food.

CHARLIE PIERCE: So if you wanted to, like, beat it, you would just eat like a dog, right?

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Oh yeah, there's always the food bag option. Just tie it on.

ROCCA: I don't use my hands when I bob for apples.

SAGAL: That's true.

PIERCE: Yes, I went bobbing for lasagna with my wife the other night.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Charlie, according to the Wall Street Journal, restaurants are beginning to cater to a whole new population of food snobs. Who?

PIERCE: Candy snobs.

SAGAL: No. It's a segment of the population that haven't been treated as real foodies before, but now...

PIERCE: The babies.

SAGAL: Yes, babies, in fact.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: The Seesaw Café in San Francisco, for example, offers a Danish and Korean inspired kid's menu, and seriously a baby-ccino.

DICKINSON: A baby-ccino?

SAGAL: It's a cappuccino without the coffee.

DICKINSON: No.

SAGAL: It's not made of baby.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

DICKINSON: You know...

PIERCE: I want more foam on my baby.

DICKINSON: Oh my.

SAGAL: And forget Gerbers, Gustorganics Restaurant in New York offers a tenderloin beef puree with zucchini, carrot and bay leaf.

ROCCA: Can the baby send it back, or do you just have to throw it across the room?

SAGAL: Exactly.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: When the baby takes the bowl and puts it on its own head, you know.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: This is for a customer whose idea of finding sustainable locally sourced things to eat usually means picking their nose, you know.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PIERCE: It's organic.

ROCCA: Yeah.

SAGAL: Charlie, the debt crisis really highlighted how strapped for cash the U.S. truly is. In fact, on Tuesday, as of Tuesday, the U.S. had less cash on hand than what other global power?

PIERCE: Wayne Newton.

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PIERCE: We're talking about another country?

SAGAL: Well...

ROCCA: No.

SAGAL: I said global power.

PIERCE: Global power, the National Football League.

SAGAL: No. I'll give you a hint. Their president's badge of office is a black mock turtleneck.

PIERCE: Uncle?

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: Can I give him a clue?

PIERCE: No, no, no.

ROCCA: Can I give him a clue?

PIERCE: What, the mafia?

DICKINSON: He's coughing up a hairball.

SAGAL: No, no, no, think...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PIERCE: Will you two just spit and get it over with?

DICKINSON: Mo, is like coughing up a hairball back here.

SAGAL: No, no, no, Charlie, Charlie, Charlie, think different.

PIERCE: I don't know.

SAGAL: You don't know? Mo?

ROCCA: Apple.

SAGAL: Yes, it's Apple.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

ROCCA: Charlie, I made the sound of an apple being eaten.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PIERCE: You made the sound of an apple being eaten by a goat.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PIERCE: Anyway, go on.

SAGAL: Anyway, the U.S. Treasury has an operating cash balance of just under $74 billion while Apple is sitting on more than $76 billion. There are differences between the two super powers. Apple, of course, makes the iPhone, the iPad, while the United States makes very bad decisions about its own future.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: People are worried that Apple might use its financial advantage to work against the United States. They might be right. Apple has shown some hostility before. For example, they've already undermined our ability to talk to each other on the phone.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: I lost my iPhone today.

SAGAL: Did you really?

ROCCA: I actually did. No, I had to replace it. I mean I was so distressed. Actually, I would have traded in my citizenship to get it back.

SAGAL: Really?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: And it's terrible to say that. I'm embarrassed by how distressed I was. It was as if I was missing a family member.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Mo?

ROCCA: Yes.

SAGAL: Police in Sweden caught a man in his kitchen doing what he said was just a hobby. What?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: It involves meatballs, Anita Ekberg, Ingmar Bergman.

PIERCE: What?

ROCCA: I'm just thinking of famous Swedes. You have to give me a clue.

SAGAL: Well, in his spice rack in his kitchen, he had oregano, paprika, and plutonium.

ROCCA: He says he was just cooking but he was actually trying to build a nuclear bomb.

SAGAL: Close. I'll give it to you. He was trying to build a nuclear reactor.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

ROCCA: Okay, all right.

SAGAL: Richard Handl liked to kick back after a long day by trying to split an atom in his kitchen.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You have to hold the knife near the blade and use a rocking motion. Apparently, we don't know why he wanted to building a nuclear reactor. Maybe he got frustrated with how the microwave always left a few popcorn kernels unpopped and decided to really get serious about it. Handl was good enough at his hobby, he caused a mini-meltdown in his oven and eventually wrote to the Sweden's Radiation Authority for help. Can you imagine that letter? "Dear Radiation Authority, I never thought this would happen to me."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: "I have a small nuclear reactor in my stove. Is that okay?"

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Smiley face.

ROCCA: You need a really thick oven mitt if you're handling a fuel rod.

SAGAL: Absolutely.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Nobody knows why he did this. Maybe he heard about fusion cuisine and decided to give it a try.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PIERCE: The Kim Jong-Il cookbook.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: And yes, nerd, we know it's fission, leave me alone.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

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