Lingering Laptop Users Wear Out Starbucks Welcome Some Starbucks in New York have started blocking their electrical outlets. They want to set a time limit on customers with laptops. Starbucks offers WiFi access and some customers complain they can never find a seat because students, freelance workers and others sit there all day.
NPR logo

Lingering Laptop Users Wear Out Starbucks Welcome

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139235310/139235516" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Lingering Laptop Users Wear Out Starbucks Welcome

Lingering Laptop Users Wear Out Starbucks Welcome

Lingering Laptop Users Wear Out Starbucks Welcome

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139235310/139235516" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some Starbucks in New York have started blocking their electrical outlets. They want to set a time limit on customers with laptops. Starbucks offers WiFi access and some customers complain they can never find a seat because students, freelance workers and others sit there all day.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Starbucks wants its seating back. Some coffee shops in New York have started blocking their electrical outlets. They want to set a time limit on customers with laptops. Starbucks offers WiFi access and some customers complain they can never find a seat because students, freelance workers and others sit there all day. Starbucks wants laptop users to move along, although it is not clear what happens if they just buy a second battery.

You are listening to MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.