Panel Round Two More questions for the panel: A Denim Debate, Harper Hides, and You Thought Getting Into College Was Hard.
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Panel Round Two

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Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

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More questions for the panel: A Denim Debate, Harper Hides, and You Thought Getting Into College Was Hard.

CARL KASELL, Host:

From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Tom Bodett, Paula Poundstone and Adam Felber. And here again is your host, at the Davis Concert Hall at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

Thank you, Carl.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you everybody. Thank you so much. In just one minute, Carl listens to the Leann Rhymes record in our Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call. The number 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news.

Adam, you may have heard the story that the Obama campaign has decided that they're most likely going to be running against Romney, and they're readying a negative campaign focused on how, quote, "weird" Romney is.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, among the evidence for his weirdness, they're going to cite Romney's taste in what?

ADAM FELBER: Messiahs.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No.

FELBER: Let's see, music.

SAGAL: No. I'll give you a hint. Nothing comes between him and his eccentricities.

FELBER: Underwear.

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

FELBER: Jeans.

SAGAL: Yes, jeans.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: His jeans, Romney's jeans. Specifically, the Gap brand skinny jeans that Mitt Romney wore at an event in New Hampshire a while ago, after his campaign advisers finally talked him out of his customary denim tuxedo.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Now, is this jeans-based attack really something that Barack "Mom Jeans" Obama wants to do?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's a classic trick, you project your own weakness onto your opponent. In fact, the Obama campaign is getting ready to launch a front group, "Swift Pants Veterans for Truth".

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They'll spread the rumor that in the 70s Romney once wore bedazzled Jordaches.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PAULA POUNDSTONE: I've never seen the guy's jeans.

SAGAL: Well that's because he usually doesn't wear them. So he came out wearing these skinny jeans and everybody was like, come on, Mitt.

POUNDSTONE: Really?

SAGAL: Yeah.

POUNDSTONE: People were upset about that?

SAGAL: People were upset about that.

POUNDSTONE: With everything going on in the world, that's what people were upset about?

SAGAL: Pretty much.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

FELBER: It was the way he combined it with the belly tee.

SAGAL: Yeah.

TOM BODETT: I was only bothered by it because he's older than I am and I can't touch a pair of skinny jeans.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: In the end, Obama may not need to bring up Romney's jeans. This week, Romney was in Iowa and when he was challenged by hecklers at the Iowa State Fair to raise taxes on corporations, he responded by saying quote, "Corporations are people, my friend," unquote. He went on to say that corporations needs to be cared for, cherished, loved, and he ended his speech by reaching into the crowd, picking up an adorable limited partnership S corporation from its mother's arms and kissing it gently on the portfolio.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It was touching really. Paula, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper unveiled a new diplomatic strategy this week. To get the Brazilian president to agree with him about something at a meeting, Harper did what?

POUNDSTONE: Complimented his pants.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Because I know that's very important in the world right now.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Those jeans flatter you.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: It's kind of a teenage girl thing to do, apologies to the teenage girls.

POUNDSTONE: I have no idea.

SAGAL: Well at first they thought that he really just had to go, but he didn't come back.

POUNDSTONE: He said he had to go use the bathroom?

SAGAL: Well, I'll give it to you. In fact, he went to the bathroom and refused to come out.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: He locked himself in the bathroom. Basically, the argument was that Harper - they were having a summit meeting in Brazil, and Harper wanted to do the speeches and toasts before luncheon was served. The president of Brazil, she wanted to do it after luncheon was served. And so in order to win the argument, Harper went and locked himself in the bathroom and refused to come out until the Brazilian president gave in and did it his way.

Both Brazilian and Canadian officials denied this account, saying actually, no, he just needed to go. Harper does have a habit of using the bathroom at odd moments. At a G-20 summit recently, and this is true, he missed out on the group picture because he had to run to the restroom, where he cried his eyes out over not being given the spot next to Angela Merkel.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: You know, I've talked to a number of people here in Alaska that have outhouses. And so I imagine their teenagers don't hide in the bathroom.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

BODETT: That's how you learn them.

SAGAL: Yeah.

POUNDSTONE: That's got to cut down on that behavior I would assume.

SAGAL: Come February, that's a cold way to have a tantrum.

POUNDSTONE: Come to your senses right away.

SAGAL: Oh yeah. Tom, according to the Wall Street Journal, new applicants have to endure extensive interviews, fill out pages and pages of forms, and face intense scrutiny from evaluators just to get into what?

BODETT: Oh this is not getting into the Wall Street Journal?

SAGAL: No.

BODETT: This is the Wall Street Journal...

SAGAL: A story in the Wall Street Journal said that the application process had become very, very rigorous, very, very difficult now, especially in the tonier parts of New York and environs to get into what?

BODETT: To get into the Vietnamese nail salon on 75th Street.

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I'll give you a hint, they may also test for appropriate coldness of nose and Frisbee-catching skills.

POUNDSTONE: Oh my gosh.

BODETT: To get into dog obedience school.

SAGAL: Not even obedience school.

BODETT: Just like doggie day care.

SAGAL: Doggie day care.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Doggie day cares are very exclusive.

BODETT: So I'm just wondering, they ask these dogs.

SAGAL: Yeah, basically, what they do is they evaluate the dogs before they agree to accept them. Does your dog growl when you take food away from him?

BODETT: Woof.

SAGAL: Does he still food when you're not looking?

BODETT: Woof.

SAGAL: If so, your dog is a dog.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Also, he's probably not welcome at a number of competitive new doggie day cares like Camp Bow Wow in New York. They require a long questionnaire, three hours of supervised play time and a high score on the L-HAT, or the leg- humping aptitude test.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

BODETT: Can you imagine cramming with your dog for his quiz the next day, you know?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

FELBER: Come on, you know this. You know this.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

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