Letters: Presidential Vacations; Bush Impersonator Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners.
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Letters: Presidential Vacations; Bush Impersonator

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Letters: Presidential Vacations; Bush Impersonator

Letters: Presidential Vacations; Bush Impersonator

Letters: Presidential Vacations; Bush Impersonator

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Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners.

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

President Obama starts his summer vacation today in Martha's Vineyard. And yesterday, Kenneth Walsh told us about the history of presidents on holiday. He's White House correspondent for U.S. News and World Report. Well, he mistakenly said that in the summer of 1799, President John Adams left Washington, D.C., for a long break. Some of our listeners correctly pointed out that this would have been impossible because at that time, the U.S. capitol was in Philadelphia.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

Also yesterday, I spoke with John Morgan. He is a George W. Bush impersonator. And he said that in recent days, he's been debating whether or not to branch out and try to impersonate another Texas Republican.

JOHN MORGAN: I was laying in bed the other night awake and saying my prayers, and I kind of said, Lord, is there anything you want to tell me before I drift off? And this thought came to my mind: RickPerryImpersonator.com.

SIEGEL: He's joking, of course, about presidential candidate Rick Perry. Well, David Bourgeois of Summerville, South Carolina, was not amused. He writes this: It is sad to hear an impersonator poking fun at Bush and Perry during primetime. The election process is important and ought to be treated as such. I don't recall you airing an Obama impersonator before.

BLOCK: And Christine Rodas of West Creek, New Jersey, writes: Sorry, ATC, your segment on the Bush impersonator just did not meet your usual high standards. Not only was it irrelevant, it wasn't even funny. Why waste valuable program time on something so trivial? She concludes: Although I did not vote for the man, I think it is time to stop using George W. Bush for cheap laughs.

SIEGEL: Finally, we got a note of praise from Jana Peacock of Macon, Georgia. She enjoyed our review of a tribute album for songwriter Tom T. Hall.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SNEAKY SNAKE")

BUDDY MILLER: (Singing) Boys and girls take warning if you go near the lake. Keep your eyes wide open and look for Sneaky Snake.

SIEGEL: Ms. Peacock writes: My brother and I had just been reminiscing over the old eight-track version of "Sneaky Snake" and trying to remember the artist so that we could share these songs with my daughter. Your story and a quick iTunes purchase later, and my delighted daughter was soon singing with my old root beer-stealing friend. Thanks for helping me connect my child to something that was so precious to me as a child.

BLOCK: Thank you for your letters. And please, keep writing. Just go to NPR.org and click on Contact Us.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SNEAKY SNAKE")

MILLER: (Singing) I don't like old Sneaky Snake. He laughs too much you see. When he goes wiggling through the grass, it tickles his underneath.

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