Letters: Dominique Strauss-Kahn; Earthquake Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners.
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Letters: Dominique Strauss-Kahn; Earthquake

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Letters: Dominique Strauss-Kahn; Earthquake

Letters: Dominique Strauss-Kahn; Earthquake

Letters: Dominique Strauss-Kahn; Earthquake

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139923593/139923578" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

It's time now for your letters and several corrections about our coverage of the Dominique Strauss-Kahn case. Yesterday, some of you heard us report that Strauss-Kahn had been acquitted of sexual assault charges, bringing an end to a three-month criminal investigation, but as several listeners pointed out, Strauss-Kahn was never tried in court and, therefore, could not have been acquitted. Rather, his charges were dismissed.

SIEGEL: And in a story from earlier week, we said Strauss-Kahn faces sexual assault charges in France. He is being investigated for sexual assault there, but he has not been formally charged.

BLOCK: We also received letters about the earthquake yesterday that shook much of the East Coast. One of our listeners out west, Dave Moore of Sandy, Utah writes this: I can understand how a rare earthquake under your own two feet deserves some air time, but I do find it amazing just how much air time you gave this quake. I assume you noticed that a quake nearly as large and nearly as rare struck my neighboring state of Colorado at about the same time as the Virginia quake, yet I have heard no mention of it on NPR.

SIEGEL: Finally, yesterday, we remembered two legendary songwriters who died this week, Jerry Lieber and Nick Ashford. Melissa spoke with soul singer Ben E. King, about their legacies and their most iconic songs.

BEN E: Well, when I think about Jerry, of course, then there's "Spanish Harlem" and then definitely "Stand By Me" and then there's "Save the Last Dance For Me." I can just keep going and going and going until we run out of tape.

SIEGEL: Well, while Jerry Lieber did produce "Save the Last Dance For Me," Lou Bank of Chicago notes that Lieber didn't actually write it. Mr. Banks says this: it was the beloved Doc Pomus who wrote that song, a reflection of his wedding night. Doc was wheelchair-bound, a childhood victim of polio. The night of his wedding, he watched all of his friends dance with his bride, but he got the last dance.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SAVE THE LAST DANCE FOR ME")

BLOCK: Well, you don't have to save the last dance for us, but please do write to us. Go to NPR.org and click on Contact Us.

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