Letters: Hurricane Irene Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners.
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Letters: Hurricane Irene

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Letters: Hurricane Irene

Letters: Hurricane Irene

Letters: Hurricane Irene

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Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, host: And I'm Melissa Block. It's time now for your letters. In our coverage ahead of Hurricane Irene, many of you heard us say on Friday that a major hurricane has not hit the U.S. since 2005. Well, some of you took issue with that, citing Hurricane Ike in 2008. To clarify, the National Hurricane Center defines a major hurricane as Category 3 or higher. As devastating as it was, Hurricane Ike was Category 2 when it made landfall in Galveston, Texas.

And we now know that, by the Hurricane Center's own definition, Hurricane Irene would not be considered major either, although many on the East Coast still struggling with flooding and power outages would certainly disagree.

SIEGEL: Also, in our coverage of Irene, we asked why don't we bury more power lines? Well, many of you joined in that debate and Hosford(ph) of Omaha suggests the problem is not the power lines themselves, but the trees. She writes this. Trees do not just fall down in a windstorm. Trees are often planted at the wrong depth, too close to pavement or foundations where the roots get little water and nutrients and are planted for quick shade.

And finally, Ms. Hosford writes, with a little personal responsibility, we could all be safer and not pay to bury or replace so many above ground lines.

BLOCK: And Nigel Casserly(ph) of Shepherdstown, West Virginia, writes, while your piece on burying power lines was on, I could not help myself from shouting at the computer on which I was listening, saying, what about Europe and England, where power outages seldom occur and nearly everything is buried? I just do not understand the reluctance to bury. Please do a follow-up story on outages and the costs, et cetera, in Europe and England. From an Englishman who's been in the USA for 43 years and will be in England and France next week enjoying the lack of poles.

SIEGEL: We enjoy your letters. Send them our way at npr.org. Just click on Contact Us.

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