King Creosote And Jon Hopkins: Tiny Desk Concert To immerse yourself in Diamond Mine is to be transported to the Scottish countryside. Standing in the NPR Music offices, the album's unassuming creators somehow lose little of their mystique.

Tiny Desk

King Creosote And Jon Hopkins

King Creosote and John Hopkins: Tiny Desk Concert

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140091470/140157087" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

At the risk of serving up a spoiler three months in advance, King Creosote and Jon Hopkins' Diamond Mine is going to turn up near the top of many Best Albums of 2011 lists on this website. The breathless love isn't unanimous across the NPR Music staff, but it's widespread and intense, and rightfully so. For all its brevity — just seven songs in 32 minutes — Diamond Mine is an absolutely spectacular record, as plainspoken and charming as it is breathtaking in its cinematic sweep.

It's also got some mystery going for it — Scottish singer King Creosote, a.k.a. Kenny Anderson, is prolific but little-known in the U.S., while English producer and multi-instrumentalist Jon Hopkins is better known for his room-filling electronic works — as further evidenced by packaging that never shows either of their faces. So watching these two unassuming, modestly dressed guys re-create Diamond Mine's beauty from just a few feet away can be jarring, especially to those who've spun the record, say, dozens of times in recent months.

To immerse yourself in Diamond Mine is to be transported to a small, calm town in the Scottish countryside: For all of Anderson's reflective ruminations on aging and regret, he and Hopkins know how to make listeners feel at peace; to make the faraway seem everyday. Standing in the NPR Music offices, they somehow lose little of their mystique. Once they've led listeners through two of Diamond Mine's highlights — "John Taylor's Month Away" and "Bubble" — it's easy to follow them wherever they're going next. (On the night of this performance, a bunch of us from NPR Music road-tripped to a coffee shop in Vienna, Va., just to hear them perform these songs again.) That they follow the Diamond Mine songs with two more of Anderson's divine compositions is just a bonus.

Set List

  • "John Taylor's Month Away"
  • "Bubble"
  • "Cockle Shell"
  • "And The Racket They Made"

Credits

Tucker Walsh, Michael Katzif (cameras); edited by Michael Katzif; audio by Kevin Wait; photo by Emily Bogle

[+] read more[-] less

More From Tiny Desk

Snarky Puppy performs during a Tiny Desk Concert on Sept. 12, 2019. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Bogle/NPR

Snarky Puppy

The jazz, funk and gospel improv group brought jams and joy to the Tiny Desk.

Burna Boy performs during a Tiny Desk concert on Sept. 16, 2019. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Burna Boy

The Nigerian singer and songwriter is one of the biggest African artists in the world and a pioneer of Afro-fusion, an inescapable sound this year.

Kokoko! performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Oct. 1, 2019. (Mhari Shaw/NPR) Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

KOKOKO!

KOKOKO! are sonic warriors. They seized control of the Tiny Desk, shouting their arrival through a megaphone, while electronic sirens begin to blare.

Sunny War Laura/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Laura/NPR

Sunny War

Sunny War has been homeless, busked on city streets and Venice Beach, left home feeling she was a burden to her mother, battled addiction and still found a way to bring joy to others thru her music.

Leslie Odom Jr. plays a Tiny Desk Concert Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Leslie Odom Jr.

The Tony- and Grammy-winning singer, actor, author and Hamilton star performs three songs from Mr, his genre-bending new solo album.

Dave plays a Tiny Desk Concert at NPR (Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR). Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR

Dave

The British rapper made a trip all the way from the UK just for this Tiny Desk performance and powered through a set that made the personal political.

BJ the Chicago Kid performs at a Tiny Desk Concert on Sept. 3, 2019. (Emily Bogle/NPR) Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Bogle/NPR

BJ The Chicago Kid

The 34-year old R&B mainstay used his moment at the desk to fit in as many of his most cherished songs as possible — Nine songs in 17 minutes to be exact.

Rio Mira plays a Tiny Desk Concert (Shuran Huang/NPR). Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Shuran Huang/NPR

Rio Mira

Rio Mira's music celebrates life along the river that separates Ecuador and Colombia: soft breezes, loving friends, the embrace of Africa and lots of festejando!

Chai plays a Tiny Desk Concert (Bob Boilen/NPR). Bob Boilen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Bob Boilen/NPR

CHAI

The group from Japan is on a mission to expand the conventional meaning of "cute." Their performance included synchronized dancing, pom-poms and matching pink uniforms, with a heavy, angular sound.

Jovino Santos Neto Trio plays a Tiny Desk Concert (Shuran Huang/NPR). Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Shuran Huang/NPR

Jovino Santos Neto Trio

Along with his trio, the pianist, multi-instrumentalist and composer cast a spell over the NPR Music offices in this joyful turn behind the Tiny Desk.

Back To Top