Grasshopper Kabobs Grasshoppers are commonly eaten throughout the world. This is one of the recipes used by the Anthropology Club of Washington College in Chestertown, Md., for its pre-Halloween bug bake sale.
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Grasshopper Kabobs

Grasshoppers are commonly eaten throughout the world. This recipe for grilling them is adapted from Eat-a-Bug Cookbook: 33 Ways to Cook Grasshoppers, Ants, Water Bugs, Spiders, Centipedes, and Their Kin by David George Gordon, and used by the Anthropology Club of Washington College in Chestertown, Md., for its pre-Halloween bug food sale.

Makes 6 servings

1/2 cup lemon juice

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon honey

1/2 teaspoon freshly grated ginger

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

2 tablespoons minced fresh herbs (parsley, mint, thyme and/or tarragon)

12 frozen grasshoppers, katydids or locusts, thawed

1 red pepper, cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks

1 small yellow onion, cut into 8 wedges

Mix the first six ingredients together for the marinade in a nonreactive baking dish.

Add the insects, cover and marinate overnight. When ready to cook, remove the insects from the marinade. Pat them dry, for ease of handling.

Assemble each kabob, alternately skewering the insects, peppers and onion wedges to create a visually interesting lineup. Brush the grill lightly with olive oil. Cook the kabobs two or three inches above the fire, turning them every two or three minutes and basting them with additional olive oil as required.

The exact cooking time will vary, depending on the kind of grill and types of insects used. However, the kabobs should cook for no longer than eight or nine minutes.

More Ideas For Cooking Bugs

From the Washington College Anthropology Club.

Worms: Boil them with ginger, garlic, shallots, chili pepper and coconut milk. Stir fry.

Ants and crickets: Roast with Old Bay seasoning