It's All Politics, Feb. 9, 2012 So now it's Rick Santorum's turn. No delegates, but plenty of headlines, after his sweep on Tuesday. Once again, it leads to questions about Mitt Romney's inevitability ... as well as Newt Gingrich's hopes for a two-person race. Plus: the Super Bowl and the controversial ads that accompanied it.
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It's All Politics, Feb. 9, 2012

It's All Politics, Feb. 9, 2012

Last week's podcast

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GOP presidential candidate Rick Santorum speaks to supporters in St. Charles, Missouri. Santorum won the caucuses in Minnesota and Colorado and the Missouri primary.
Whitney Curtis/Getty Images

So now it's Rick Santorum's turn. No delegates, but plenty of headlines, after his sweep of Tuesday's contests. Once again it leads to questions about Mitt Romney's inevitability ... as well as Newt Gingrich's hope to make it a two-person race. Plus: the Super Bowl (according to Ken, it was super) and the controversial commercials that accompanied it. NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving have the latest in this week's political roundup.