The Cranberries: Tiny Desk Concert The best-selling Irish pop-rock band has returned with a new album called Roses. But the group isn't afraid to dip into its arsenal of early hits at the NPR Music offices.

Tiny Desk

The Cranberries

The Cranberries: Tiny Desk Concert

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/147191308/147267871" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

There's got to be some sort of equation to determine the precise moment for which the most possible people feel nostalgic at a given moment — the sweet spot would likely fall somewhere between 15 and 20 years prior to the present. That way, young adults can attach to their early childhood, while those approaching middle age can bask in the glow of their college years. (Hopefully, those in their early 30s have forgotten the worst of junior high.) All of which is a long windup to this immutable truth: When we decided to bring The Cranberries to the NPR Music offices, an absolute honkload of people showed up to watch.

The Irish group's alternately pretty and strident early- to mid-'90s hits ("Linger," "Salvation," "Zombie," et al) have aged well, as have the band members themselves, so now marks a perfect time for The Cranberries to break a lengthy hiatus. Wisely, though, singer Dolores O'Riordan and company aren't turning a blind eye to the past: This five-song Tiny Desk Concert includes early hits "Linger," "Ode to My Family" and "Zombie," and if the band played them out of some sort of grudging sense of obligation, you'd never know it. Naturally, fresh material also popped up on the landscape, as The Cranberries showed off two solid songs ("Tomorrow" and "Raining in My Heart") from a new album called Roses, which comes out next Tuesday.

Thoughts on a Cranberries Tiny Desk Concert will no doubt range from "The Cranberries?" to "The Cranberries!" But wherever you reside on that spectrum, it's worth visiting — and, appropriately enough, revisiting — this charming performance.

Set List:

  • "Linger"
  • "Tomorrow"
  • "Ode To My Family"
  • "Zombie"
  • "Raining In My Heart"

Credits:

Producer: Bob Boilen; Editor: Michael Katzif; Videographers: Michael Katzif and Doriane Raiman; Audio Engineer: Kevin Wait; photos by Kainaz Amaria and Michael Katzif/NPR

[+] read more[-] less

More From Tiny Desk

Jacob Collier plays a Tiny Desk Concert on May 16, 2019. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Claire Harbage/NPR

Jacob Collier

As the NPR staff gathered to watch his performance, Jacob Collier sprinted full bore down the hallway for his set, hardly able to contain his creative energy or enthusiasm.

Priests performs a Tiny Desk Concert on June 7, 2019. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Shuran Huang/NPR

Priests

The punk-infused art band from Washington, D.C. brings a kinder, gentler and sparer version of the group's music to the Tiny Desk.

Erin Rae and the Meanwhiles perform at Tiny Desk on June 11. Photo by Olivia Falcigno/NPR Olivia Falcigno/NPR/Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Olivia Falcigno/NPR/Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Erin Rae

Every time she performs live, Erin Rae transforms her quiet storms into different hues of squalling introspection.

Sting and Shaggy perform a Tiny Desk Concert on Sept. 19, 2018. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Cameron Pollack/NPR

Sting And Shaggy

The two musical legends brought plenty of joy to the Tiny Desk, with an unexpected collaboration that works surprisingly well.

Miya Folick plays a Tiny Desk Concert on Feb. 21, 2019. Jenna Sterner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jenna Sterner/NPR

Miya Folick

Miya Folick was raised a Buddhist in Santa Ana, Calif., and is of Ukrainian and Japanese descent. She sings of conviction, not fiction.

Gemma Doherty (left) and Morgan MacIntyre performing as Saint Sister during their Tiny Desk Concert at NPR in Washington, D.C. Michael Zamora/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Michael Zamora/NPR

Saint Sister

The group from Ireland makes music that mixes the organic with the electronic, starting with a large, 34-string lever harp.

Be More Chill plays a Tiny Desk Concert on June 10, 2019 (Shuran Huang/NPR). Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Shuran Huang/NPR

Be More Chill

On Broadway, Be More Chill is a playful burst of frenetic energy and silly, stealthy sweetness. At the Tiny Desk, it holds onto that rowdy, generous spirit while stripping down the arrangements.

Tasha Cobbs Leonard plays a Tiny Desk Concert on June 4, 2019 (Shuran Huang/NPR). Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Shuran Huang/NPR

Tasha Cobbs Leonard

Tasha Cobbs Leonard is widely regarded as one of the best gospel singers performing today. Her set at the Tiny Desk moved many at the NPR offices to tears.

Imogen Heap plays a Tiny Desk Conert on May 4, 2019 (Colin Marshall/NPR). Colin Marshall/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Colin Marshall/NPR

Imogen Heap

Imogen Heap takes us through her many musical talents, from her Frou Frou musical partner, Guy Sigsworth — and their first new song in 17 years — to an extraordinary performance with musical gloves.

Idles plays a Tiny Desk Concert on May 13, 2019 (Claire Harbage/NPR). Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Claire Harbage/NPR

IDLES

The British madmen brought fury, cathartic rage and deep thoughts to the Tiny Desk for one of the loudest, most raucous performances in memory.

Back To Top