AT&T, Union Extend Contract Negotiations The contract extension has prevented a mass walkout by some 40,000 unionized workers. The deadline for a new contract was Sunday. AT&T is seeking concessions from its workers — including cuts in pension contributions, and an increase in health care premiums. The union is calling these concessions "unrealistic."
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AT&T, Union Extend Contract Negotiations

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AT&T, Union Extend Contract Negotiations

AT&T, Union Extend Contract Negotiations

AT&T, Union Extend Contract Negotiations

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The contract extension has prevented a mass walkout by some 40,000 unionized workers. The deadline for a new contract was Sunday. AT&T is seeking concessions from its workers — including cuts in pension contributions, and an increase in health care premiums. The union is calling these concessions "unrealistic."

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with labor woes at AT&T.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: AT&T and union officials have agreed to extend contract negotiations, preventing a mass walkout by some 40,000 unionized workers. The deadline to agree on the new contract had been yesterday. AT&T is seeking concessions from its workers, including cuts in pension contributions, and also an increase in health care premiums. The union is calling those concessions unrealistic.

AT&T has seen revenues go down in its traditional home and business landline divisions which have suffered as more people switched to mobile devices.

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