Stephin Merritt: A Few Ways To Off Your Ex The Magnetic Fields' frontman stops by the WFUV studio to perform his song "Your Girlfriend's Face," armed only with a ukulele. Along the way, the song's wit and dark humor get an intimate showcase.

Favorite Sessions

Stephin Merritt: A Few Ways To Off Your ExWFUV

Sometimes Stephin Merritt's dry demeanor can be misconstrued as standoffish or apathetic, but he was very friendly and engaging when he stopped by WFUV for a live session in Studio A. He played a few favorites from The Magnetic Fields' catalog, as well as a couple of songs from the band's new album, Love at the Bottom of the Sea, but his solo, ukulele performances have a different feel.

"Your Girlfriend's Face," as seen and heard here, features some of the sweetest, happiest production on the album (not to mention the voice of Claudia Gonson), but with Merritt handling the lead — and also walking out of the studio while playing — the song's humor and wit shines through in a different way.

You can find the rest of Merritt's performance on WFUV's website.

Credits

Russ Borris, host; Jim O'Hara, audio engineering and video editing; Tim Teeling, Tim Pierson and Joe Grimaldi, camera work.

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