Norah Jones In Concert The singer stops by World Cafe Live in Philadelphia to play songs from her decade of genre explorations. Here, Jones finds a way to mix her past coffeehouse jazz with this year's Little Broken Hearts.

Norah Jones In Concert

Concerts

Norah Jones In ConcertXPN

Norah Jones In Concert

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/153620168/153709708" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

By the numbers, Norah Jones' career is almost unheard-of: How many artists sell 20 million copies of their first album? Jones' sultry, soulful Come Away With Me launched a career in which she won Grammy after Grammy, collaborated with the likes of Ray Charles, Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton, OutKast, Foo Fighters... the list goes on. Through it all, she's remained adventurous, incorporating country, roots-rock and trip-hop elements into her jazzy releases.

Jones has music in her blood: The daughter of sitar legend Ravi Shankar and concert producer Sue Jones, she was born in New York and raised in Texas. Soon, she developed a love for Billie Holiday, played the alto sax and piano, and made her way to New York with songs in hand. Jones is now on her fifth studio album, Little Broken Hearts. Produced by Danger Mouse (a.k.a. Brian Burton), the collection forgoes the soft coffeehouse jazz of Jones' past in favor of rough-around-the-edges pop.

Here, she performs a short concert at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia, as part of WXPN's Non-Commvention.

Set List

  • "Happy Pills"
  • "Little Broken Hearts"
  • "Travelin' On"
  • "Take It Back"
  • "Say Goodbye"
  • "Come Away With Me"
[+] read more[-] less

More From Concerts

Willie Pickens On Piano Jazz

Chicago jazz mainstay Willie Pickens died this past December at age 86. Revisit his performance with McPartland in this 1997 episode of Piano Jazz.

Willie Pickens On Piano Jazz

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604342537/604343909" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sam Baker performs on Mountain Stage Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Sam Baker On Mountain Stage

During the Austin songwriter's second appearance on Mountain Stage, he performs a career-spanning set.

Sam Baker On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/603634238/603645991" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Cleo Brown on the cover of Here Comes Cleo. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the artist

Cleo Brown On Piano Jazz

Cleo Brown makes a rare appearance to perform her greatest hit, "Pinetop's Boogie-Woogie," and to recall the style's heyday in the 1930s.

Cleo Brown On Piano Jazz

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/602133644/602133663" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Alison Krauss & Union Station On Mountain Stage

Listen to this retrospective, in which the bluegrass legend performs cuts from Lonely Runs Both Ways with her iconic band during a 2005 appearance.

Alison Krauss & Union Station On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/601200599/601922571" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
NEA

The 2018 NEA Jazz Masters Tribute Concert

WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

Dianne Reeves, Pat Metheny, Joanne Brackeen and Todd Barkan are recipients of the 2018 Jazz Masters award — the highest honor the U.S. gives to a jazz musician or advocate.

Tyler Childers performs a Tiny Desk Concert on March 8, 2018 (Eslah Attar/NPR). Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Eslah Attar/NPR

Tyler Childers

Tyler Childers writes songs about hard lives and hard love with direct heart and a soulful Kentucky drawl.

Gus Bennett, Jr./Courtesy of the artist

Nicholas Payton On Piano Jazz

The trumpet prodigy learned how to improv from fellow New Orleans native Wynton Marsalis. Payton was only in his 20s when he visited with McPartland for this 1998 episode.

Nicholas Payton On Piano Jazz

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/598825823/600192516" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Bettye LaVette On Mountain Stage

The legendary soul artist's star-studded 2018 album Things Have Changed includes re-imagined classics by Bob Dylan, which she performs on this episode of Mountain Stage.

Bettye LaVette On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/598806095/599870358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Courtesy of the artist

Gil Goldstein On Piano Jazz

In this 2001 episode, the D.C. native and frequent film composer performs his original "City Lights" as well as demonstrates his chops on the accordion.

Gil Goldstein On Piano Jazz

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/598056503/598226187" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Back To Top