Comedian Sells Out Concert Tour In Less Than 2 Days Comedian Louis C.K. sold out his tour while bypassing ticket services like Ticketmaster. He sold tickets on his website for a flat fee of $45. He raised $4.5 million.
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Comedian Sells Out Concert Tour In Less Than 2 Days

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Comedian Sells Out Concert Tour In Less Than 2 Days

Comedian Sells Out Concert Tour In Less Than 2 Days

Comedian Sells Out Concert Tour In Less Than 2 Days

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155893980/155890308" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Comedian Louis C.K. sold out his tour while bypassing ticket services like Ticketmaster. He sold tickets on his website for a flat fee of $45. He raised $4.5 million.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The comedian Louis C.K. says he has sold out a 39-city tour in less than two days. And he did it by bypassing traditional ticketing services, like Ticketmaster. He started selling the tickets on his website Monday for a flat $45, and has taken in $4.5 million in sales.

For those not familiar with C.K.'s comedy, one of his best-known bits, here with Conan O'Brien, is a rant about people's expectations for new technology.

(SOUNDBITE OF COMEDY SKETCH)

(LAUGHTER)

(LAUGHTER)

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: The ticket sales aren't the first time that the comedian has subverted the entertainment industry standard practices. He let fans download his hour-long, stand-up special for only $5 last year, and said the proceeds more than paid for the cost of producing it. It's a pretty good week for the comedian. The third season of his TV series, "Louie," starts tonight.

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