Deer Tick Among The Honey Buckets Deer Tick frontman John McCauley performs "Main Street" among the portable toilets at the 2012 Sasquatch Music Festival. Appropriately, the song is a morning-after number.

Field Recordings

Deer Tick Among The Honey BucketsKEXP

We were late getting set up. As Deer Tick's John McCauley stood on the picturesque hillside of the Columbia River Gorge, about to strum the first chord of a song, another band started to blast us from the main stage nearby. We had to leave. It was a relief, really, because the natural majesty of the surroundings didn't seem at home with Deer Tick's music — especially not the Replacements-esque party attitude of the band's new album, Divine Providence.

So we drove as far away from the painted landscape as we could in the short time we had to capture this Field Recording. We landed at the opposite end of the spectrum aesthetically — all the way to the sanitation area of the artists' campground. There, in front of a row of Honey Buckets, the Deer Tick frontman performed "Main Street," appropriately one of Divine Providence's morning-after numbers; the song exudes regret and loss while remaining brash and defiant. For the minutes he played, it was the most beautiful spot around.

Credits

Producers: Jim Beckmann, Scott Holpainen; Videographers: Jim Beckmann, Mito Habe-Evans, Scott Holpainen; Audio Engineers: Matt Ogaz, Kevin Wait; Editor: Scott Holpainen; Coordinator: Saidah Blount; Special thanks to: Sasquatch Music Festival, Live Nation

[+] read more[-] less

More From Rock

The Black Crowes play a Tiny Desk concert. bob boilen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption bob boilen/NPR

The Black Crowes

Chris and Rich Robinson revisit songs from their debut album, Shake Your Money Maker.

Coldplay performs a Tiny Desk Concert at NPR Music on Jan. 23, 2019 (Emily Bogle/NPR) Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Bogle/NPR

Coldplay

A nine-piece choir joins the band for an inspired reworking of four Coldplay songs — and a surprise cover of Prince's "1999."

Indigo Sparke performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Nov. 21, 2019. (Catie Dull/NPR) Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Catie Dull/NPR

Indigo Sparke

The Australian singer transforms the NPR Music offices with a voice that, at moments, comes as a whisper.

Another Sky performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Dec. 5, 2019. (Catie Dull/NPR) Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Catie Dull/NPR

Another Sky

The strength of this London band is matching message with music. There's intensity and clear intention in their use of rock as an art.

Jimmy Eat World performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Dec. 6, 2019. (Catie Dull/NPR) Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Catie Dull/NPR

Jimmy Eat World

Jimmy Eat World showed up to the NPR Music office all smiles and no guitars. They borrowed a couple acoustics, a gong and a tambourine for a heartfelt set that included "The Middle."

J.S. Ondara performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Nov. 5, 2019. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Catie Dull/NPR

J.S. Ondara

After first trying to win our annual Tiny Desk Contest, the singer-songwriter from Nairobi decided to put out a record, got nominated for a Grammy and wound up here anyway.

Yola Carter performs during tiny desk on December, 12, 2019. (Photo by Mhari Shaw/NPR) Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Yola

The singer who once sang for Massive Attack and sampled by Iggy Azalea and The Chemical Brothers, is front-and-center at the Tiny Desk.

Daniel Norgren performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Sep. 25, 2019. (Catie Dull/NPR) Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Catie Dull/NPR

Daniel Norgren

The Swedish singer sways and writhes as he and his band create a dream state calming enough to slow the day's hectic pace to a crawl. Take a seat on a comfy couch and have a listen.

The Comet Is Coming performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Oct. 2, 2019. (Catie Dull/NPR) Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Catie Dull/NPR

The Comet Is Coming

The Comet is Coming is a force of nature. The British trio makes the kind of instrumental jazz that takes music lovers out of their comfort zone and into a musical realm they may never have explored.

Weyes Blood performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Oct. 7, 2019. (Mhari Shaw/NPR) Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Weyes Blood

Watch the band perform a blissed-out, gently sweeping set featuring three songs from its latest album, Titanic Rising.

Back To Top