Kayhan Kalhor & Erdal Erzincan: globalFEST 2013 Iran's Kayhan Kalhor joins Turkish artist Erdal Erzincan for this intimate performance, recorded live at New York City's Webster Hall.
Kayhan Kalhaor and Erdal Erzincan perform live for globalFEST 2013.
Ebru Yildiz for NPR

globalFEST

Kayhan Kalhor & Erdal Erzincan 2013

Kayhan Kalhor & Erdal Erzincan: globalFEST 2013

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The soulful Persian classical virtuoso and composer Kayhan Kalhor has long been interested in creating artistic bridges to other musicians and styles, including in his work with Yo-Yo Ma's Silk Road Project and a long-term collaboration with the Indian sitarist Shujaat Khan.

At this year's edition of globalFEST, Kalhor revived a partnership that initially began about a decade ago with a Turkish master artist, the baglama player Erdal Erzincan. Together, they create beautiful, buoyant and extended improvisations that draw upon the shared connections between Persian and Turkish music, with Erzincan's baglama (a long-necked plucked lute) in deep and brilliant discourse with Kalhor's kemancheh, a spiked fiddle alternately bowed in surging, long and lyrical lines or plucked percussively.

Credits

Producers: Mito Habe-Evans, Bob Boilen; Videographers: Gabriella Garcia-Pardo, Mito Habe-Evans; Audio Engineer: Kevin Wait; Video Editor: Denise DeBelius Assistant Producer: Denise DeBelius; Special Thanks to: Webster Hall, globalFEST 2013; Executive Producers: Anya Grundmann, Keith Jenkins.

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