Supporters Of Gay Marriage Appear To Gather Momentum Polls show a majority of Americans now support gay marriage. During Supreme Court's arguments last week, Chief Justice John Roberts marveled at the political muscle advocates for same-sex marriage appeared to be flexing. But the political path for gay marriage could be long and bumpy.

Supporters Of Gay Marriage Appear To Gather Momentum

Supporters Of Gay Marriage Appear To Gather Momentum

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Polls show a majority of Americans now support gay marriage. During Supreme Court's arguments last week, Chief Justice John Roberts marveled at the political muscle advocates for same-sex marriage appeared to be flexing. But the political path for gay marriage could be long and bumpy.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. The demonstrators for and against gay marriage who gathered outside the Supreme Court last week have gone home. Now, it's up to the nine justices to decide how same-sex marriage should be treated by the federal government, the state of California, and possibly other states as well. Some commentators suggest that no matter how the court rules, gay marriages will eventually be recognized nationwide, thanks to growing public support. But as NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the political path to that outcome could be long and bumpy.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: During the Supreme Court's arguments last week, Chief Justice John Roberts marveled at the political muscle advocates for same-sex marriage appear to be flexing.

(SOUNDBITE OF SUPREME COURT ARGUMENT)

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