1-Bit Composer Tristan Perich's Practice Space The composer makes big music with tiny electronics. A visit with the multimedia artist reveals hundreds of bins — from a carton marked "squeezing tools" (scissors, pliers) to one simply labeled "art."

Music Documentaries

Tristan Perich On Q2 Music's 'Spaces'Q2

For the third installment of Q2 Spaces, we visited the home and work space of Tristan Perich — a New York-based sound, visual and installation artist whose music blends a composer's interest in acoustic classical instruments and electronic manipulation with an inventor's exploration into circuitry and computer code.

Most known for his works 1-Bit Music and 1-Bit Symphony, which literally perform themselves through sound-producing microchip technology in CD jewel cases, Perich has seen his work featured as concert music at new music venues such as Roulette and ISSUE Project Room, but also as installation art in galleries around the world, from New York's Whitney Museum to Austria's Ars Electronica. Perich is also one of an international roster of 16 sound artists featured in "Soundings," an upcoming exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art that focuses on how sound shapes perception of space.

Perich shares his combination living space and studio with the sound artist Lesley Flanigan, and we visited him just before the couple's wedding and move to another apartment. Our tour revealed various invented instruments, the hand-crafted assembly line of 1-Bit Symphony, and an intuitive, if unorthodox, organizational system. It also revealed the omnivorous curiosity and maverick approach to music-making that has made Perich a force in today's music scene.

Soundtrack: Tristan Perich

  • "Perhaps"
  • "1-Bit Symphony, Movement No. 2 (Cantaloupe)
  • "Observations" (Bridge)
  • "qsqsqsqsqqqqqqqqq" www.tristanperich.com

Credits:

  • Video: Kim Nowacki & Alex Ambrose
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Q2

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